Brad Pitt Worries Angelina Jolie Is Not Providing Education for Children

And the drama continues for the Jolie-Pitt family. In Touch has learned exclusively that the Brad Pitt fears estranged wife Angelina Jolie hasn’t provided a proper education for their six children. As the complicated divorce trudges along, things are apparently getting worse for their kids. A family insider tells In Touch that Angelina has “lost control” of the children, and that includes their schooling — which hasn’t gone unnoticed by her ex.

“He’s troubled that they are not getting enough basic education from home tutors, whom the kids know how to con and manipulate,” the source reveals. “One of Brad’s biggest bones of contention with Angelina remains his wanting the kids in structured private schools. He knows they are smart, loving children, but he doesn’t want to see them become lost individuals later on in life.”

Angelina Jolie kids Getty

(Photo Credit: Getty Images)

The 42-year-old actress is currently living with their kids — Maddox, 16, Pax, 13, Zahara, 12, Shiloh, 11, and nine-year-old twins Knox and Vivienne — in the six-bedroom estate she purchased in Los Angeles’ Los Feliz neighborhood. And though Brad is just a few blocks away, the insider claims she’s “overwhelmed” by life as a single parent.

Because of that, her 53-year-old ex is hoping to have their custody arrangement settled soon, with schooling playing a big part in the negotiations. The source explains, “He wants a firm say in their education when custody is finally sorted out.”

This all comes after numerous reports of the A-list duo’s children running amok in their new California hometown. In early September, daughters Shiloh and Vivienne were spotted walking barefoot and looking unkempt in a Target parking lot. A source close to Brad details this is just par for the course when it comes to Angelina’s “no rules” parenting style.

It gets even worse behind closed doors, where junk food and late bedtimes are the norm for the growing brood. “It’s not uncommon for all of the kids to be up past midnight during the week, eating sugary snacks and soda,” adds the insider. “They go to bed very, very late and end up sleeping in very late the next day.” With limited sleep or nutrition, education might be the least of their concerns.

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Angelina Jolie tries to keep low-profile at the movies

She is one of the best known for her efforts in front of the camera.

But despite years in the business, Angelina Jolie still enjoys a simple night to the movies.

The 42-year-old actress was spotted trying to keep relatively a low profile while heading to the cinema for a Q&A for her film First They Killed My Father in Los Angeles on Friday night.

Movie night: Angelina Jolie was spotted trying to keep a low profile while heading to the cinema in Los Angeles on Friday night

Movie night: Angelina Jolie was spotted trying to keep a low profile while heading to the cinema in Los Angeles on Friday night

Movie night: Angelina Jolie was spotted trying to keep a low profile while heading to the cinema in Los Angeles on Friday night

She kept her look simple in a billowy black sweater for the relaxed evening out.

Angelina teamed the top with a skirt and matching thigh-high suede booties.

She accessorized with a black leather designer bag and gold bracelet.

Her brunette tresses were worn down as she let her natural looks show with minimal make-up.

Keeping cool: The 42-year-old actress  kept her look simple in a billowy black sweater for the relaxed evening out

Keeping cool: The 42-year-old actress  kept her look simple in a billowy black sweater for the relaxed evening out

Keeping cool: The 42-year-old actress  kept her look simple in a billowy black sweater for the relaxed evening out

Simply stunning: Her brunette tresses were worn down as she let her natural looks show with minimal make-up

Simply stunning: Her brunette tresses were worn down as she let her natural looks show with minimal make-up

Simply stunning: Her brunette tresses were worn down as she let her natural looks show with minimal make-up

Friendly: Despite trying to fly under the radar, she still stopped to wave at a few fans trying to get her attention

Friendly: Despite trying to fly under the radar, she still stopped to wave at a few fans trying to get her attention

Friendly: Despite trying to fly under the radar, she still stopped to wave at a few fans trying to get her attention

Hanging out: She was not alone for the occasion as she was joined by a blonde gal pal

Hanging out: She was not alone for the occasion as she was joined by a blonde gal pal

Hanging out: She was not alone for the occasion as she was joined by a blonde gal pal

Despite trying to fly under the radar, she still stopped to wave at a few fans trying to get her attention.

She was not alone for the occasion as she was joined by a blonde gal pal.

This comes just days after she looked  effortlessly elegant donning a white blouse teamed, dark A-line skirt and nude pumps Sunday in LA.

Ever the crowd pleaser, the actress/activist took time to sign autographs and chat with fans after an already lengthy Q&A about her directorial project First They Killed My Father at the Academy Of Motion Arts.

Going the extra mile: She even stopped to sign autographs for lucky fans 

Going the extra mile: She even stopped to sign autographs for lucky fans 

Going the extra mile: She even stopped to sign autographs for lucky fans 

Casual chic: Angelina teamed the top with a skirt and matching thigh-high suede booties

Casual chic: Angelina teamed the top with a skirt and matching thigh-high suede booties

Casual chic: Angelina teamed the top with a skirt and matching thigh-high suede booties

Casual chic: Angelina teamed the top with a skirt and matching thigh-high suede booties

Casual chic: Angelina teamed the top with a skirt and matching thigh-high suede booties

Quite the following: No doubt she was happy to meet her fans

Quite the following: No doubt she was happy to meet her fans

Quite the following: No doubt she was happy to meet her fans

The ex of actor Brad Pitt looked stylishly enchanting as she stepped out the event in a chic monochrome set.

Angelina, 42, remained poised while covering her eyes with square sunglasses and sweeping her dark locks to one side elegantly.

The California girl displayed jewelry-free hands while carrying two handy Sharpies to sign posters and memorabilia.

She's a classic! Days ago  Jolie looked effortlessly elegant in monochrome separates Sunday after a screening of her film First They Killed My Father at the Academy Of Motion Arts in LA

She's a classic! Days ago  Jolie looked effortlessly elegant in monochrome separates Sunday after a screening of her film First They Killed My Father at the Academy Of Motion Arts in LA

She’s a classic! Days ago Jolie looked effortlessly elegant in monochrome separates Sunday after a screening of her film First They Killed My Father at the Academy Of Motion Arts in LA

Cool cat: The ex of actor Brad Pitt looked poised as can be while covering her eyes with square sunglasses and sweeping her dark locks to one side elegantly

Cool cat: The ex of actor Brad Pitt looked poised as can be while covering her eyes with square sunglasses and sweeping her dark locks to one side elegantly

Cool cat: The ex of actor Brad Pitt looked poised as can be while covering her eyes with square sunglasses and sweeping her dark locks to one side elegantly

Sharp signature! The California girl displayed jewelry-free hands while carrying two handy Sharpies to sign posters and memorabilia

Sharp signature! The California girl displayed jewelry-free hands while carrying two handy Sharpies to sign posters and memorabilia

Sharp signature! The California girl displayed jewelry-free hands while carrying two handy Sharpies to sign posters and memorabilia

Fan favorite: The Academy Award winner has been busy promoting her heartbreaking new project First They Killed My Father recently

Fan favorite: The Academy Award winner has been busy promoting her heartbreaking new project First They Killed My Father recently

Fan favorite: The Academy Award winner has been busy promoting her heartbreaking new project First They Killed My Father recently

Recently, the Academy Award winner has been busy promoting her heartbreaking new project First They Killed My Father.

Earlier Saturday, Angelina sported a loose white dress and fringed duster jacket to another LA screening of the film she produced, wrote and directed. 

On Thursday, the UN Ambassador donned a similar look while in New York City for a stop by the United Nations HQ.

Star with a heart: The UN Ambassador donned a similar look while in New York City Thursday, where the humanitarian stopped by the United Nations HQ

Star with a heart: The UN Ambassador donned a similar look while in New York City Thursday, where the humanitarian stopped by the United Nations HQ

Star with a heart: The UN Ambassador donned a similar look while in New York City Thursday, where the humanitarian stopped by the United Nations HQ

Live through this: Angie's stirring new project tells the story of author and human rights activist Loung Ung's life through flashbacks of life under the Khmer Rouge dictatorship

Live through this: Angie's stirring new project tells the story of author and human rights activist Loung Ung's life through flashbacks of life under the Khmer Rouge dictatorship

Live through this: Angie’s stirring new project tells the story of author and human rights activist Loung Ung’s life through flashbacks of life under the Khmer Rouge dictatorship

There, she donned the same style blouse along with a pocketed pencil skirt in a savory brown hue.

First They Killed My Father: A Daughter of Cambodia Remembers tells the story of author and human rights activist Loung Ung’s life through flashbacks of life under the Khmer Rouge dictatorship.

The stirring biopic is already garnering rave reviews and is currently available to stream on Netflix. 

Ready to watch: The Jolie directed First They Killed My Father: A Daughter of Cambodia Remembers  is already garnering rave reviews and is currently available to stream on Netflix

Ready to watch: The Jolie directed First They Killed My Father: A Daughter of Cambodia Remembers  is already garnering rave reviews and is currently available to stream on Netflix

Ready to watch: The Jolie directed First They Killed My Father: A Daughter of Cambodia Remembers is already garnering rave reviews and is currently available to stream on Netflix

Art of Darkness: Angelina Jolie’s Latest Film Succeeds at Personalizing Genocide | CT Women

The other day I chatted with a friend who has lived in the US for a year or two—a refugee from Afghanistan who recently got an entry-level job in her field of engineering. She was ecstatic, eager to work her way back up the ladder. While drinking green tea, I casually asked her about her new job and what it was like to be an engineer in Afghanistan. Her two-year-old daughter was with us, eating red cherries as the juice spilled down the front of her second-hand party dress. “Oh,” my friend said, “there are no engineers there anymore.” I looked at her blankly. “What do you mean?” “All of the engineers were killed,” she told me. “The Taliban, they wanted the country to go backward. So they killed them all. Now there are villages waiting for buildings to be made, but there are no engineers to help anymore.”

She said it all so matter-of-factly while wiping her kid’s messy hands that I could barely understand her meaning. After the conversation, however, I thought a lot about how her story and others like it seem so unusual to me until they start to pile up and accumulate. As I hear more and more from my refugee and immigrant friends, as I read the news and try to pay attention to current events, suddenly I start to find that my safe and secure existence is the anomaly. My lack of proximity to suffering is what marks me as different—the outlier in a world full of horror.

I thought about this conversation as I watched the new Netflix film First They Killed My Father (a Cambodian Daughter Remembers). I’m not sure anyone is strong enough to watch a genocide unfold through the eyes of a five-year-old. And yet, this is precisely who experiences these horrors—little children, the elderly, the vulnerable. In an American culture like ours—several generations removed from a world war and comfortably certain genocide could never happen on our watch—it seems deliberate that director Angelina Jolie chose a child protagonist to walk us through the Cambodian genocide of the late 1970s.

Loung, played by Sareum Srey Moch, is the eyes and ears of First They Killed My Father, which was co-adapted from the book of the same title by Loung Ung. (It’s worth noting that Ung is one of Jolie’s closest friends.) The film keeps a close focus on Loung, played luminously by Moch, who over the course of the story becomes increasingly traumatized by all that she witnesses. For those of us who might typically be turned off by a more traditional war movie, the arc of this film provides a different experience and allows us to see the intimate destruction that regimes, soldiers, and fellow citizens often enact on one another.

While watching the film, I couldn’t help but recall some of Jesus’ most well-known words: “Blessed are the pure in heart, for they shall see God.” Who is purer than our children? Their eyes are powerful precisely because they see everything without fully understanding. Watching Loung slowly shed her joy and turn quiet, inward, ever watchful—sometimes slipping into a vivid dream of longing, sometimes fixating on tiny details—feels akin to watching someone experience death. Through her eyes, the audience gets a glimpse of the worst of what our broken world has to offer and how in turn it longs to make us see God, as well.

By using a five-year-old as a protagonist, Jolie is choosing an innocent character for the audience to identify with. Perhaps it’s because I have a young daughter or because I live and work in communities of refugees and immigrants, whatever the case, Loung is easily identifiable to me as a neighbor. She is someone who in God’s kingdom belongs to me and I to her. While watching her story, I was overcome with a feeling of personal responsibility laced with helplessness. After all, the genocide in Cambodia took place 40 years ago, so there’s not much I can do about it. But even so, the storyline is more relevant than ever.

Because I teach English to speakers of other languages, I meet people whose home countries are making headlines. People from Cambodia, yes, but more recent conflict zones like Somalia, Libya, Afghanistan, Syria, and Myanmar. Women will tell me a few sentences here or there—journeys they have undertaken, possessions they have left behind, loved ones who have died or been killed. All of them, however, tell stories where the world as they knew it ended.

Some are more pointed than others. A friend of mine from church who often serves on the worship team recently shared at an event commemorating the 23rd anniversary of the Rwandan genocide of the Tutsi by the Hutu. I knew Emmanuel as a fellow worshiper, but I didn’t know his personal history. When he shared his story—how his father was gruesomely murdered, how he barely escaped—I was shaken to my core.

Other survivors shared stories, as well. A second-generation Rwandan stood up—a young man in his senior year of high school in Oregon. Along with everyone else, he was dressed in a dark suit as if he were attending a funeral. In the halls of the high school and in the wider news, he told us he was starting to hear language that was meant to dehumanize entire people groups. Undocumented immigrants, refugees, and people who identify as transgender were all groups he had personally seen and heard being attacked by others. He asked us to pay attention and to fight against the language that normalizes violence and strips people of their imago Dei.

After multiple survivors shared the same sentiment—they feel as if the US is in a pre-genocidal moment—I was compelled to go home and pay more attention to the words being used in our public discourse by our highest elected officials. Many of them fit the technical definition of pre-genocidal actions as outlined by Genocide Watch. Dehumanizing language that refers to people as “animals, vermin, insects or diseases” has been mainstreamed. For example, President Trump recited a poem comparing Syrian refugees to a venomous snake countless times during his campaign and after he was elected, including at a rally celebrating his 100 days in office.

(A more casual but nonetheless serious example, in my opinion, is the frequency with which entire groups of people are called “illegal.” As Elie Wiesel, a survivor of the Holocaust, has said, “no human being is illegal.” Being cautious with the language we use toward groups of people we deem different by race, ethnicity, or legal status is not a matter of being seen as “correct,” either politically or morally. Rather, it has a direct correlation to how we treat them and also how we enact public policy on their behalf.)

At the moment, the small nation of Myanmar is experiencing a genocide. For decades, the Rohingya Muslims, an ethnic and religious minority, have experienced targeted persecution by the Buddhist majority, and the persecution has recently been ramped up under the watchful eye of their Nobel Peace Prize–winning president (an irony that is truly terrible to behold). The UN recently declared the situation in Myanmar as “textbook ethnic cleansing”—a phrase no one wishes to hear in their own lifetime.

In my own neighborhood, there are several Rohingya families who have been resettled in the past year or so. They cook food for me, squeeze my toddler’s cheeks, and drop by for a chat every now and again. I know the names of their children and the grades they are in at school, including the Rohingya boy in my daughter’s second-grade class. He is the one I picture as I read the news of more killings, of the government torching homes, beheading people, and planting landmines on the border to Bangladesh as the Rohingya try to flee. It doesn’t feel like a genocide happening far away—it feels close by. It feels like my neighbors are suffering—and just as the apostle Paul said, “If one part suffers, every part suffers with it” (1 Cor. 12:26).

In this context of global upheaval, First They Killed My Father is a tremendously important film. For those of us who are not blessed with neighbors from far away countries, it allows us to see all of God’s beloved children as our neighbors, no matter the distance, geography, culture, or religion. That’s why Jolie, Ung, and the cast and crew of the film are blessed in my eyes. Through this film, I now have a better view of Cambodians as my neighbors, and I can catch a glimpse of the image of God wandering the earth in the midst of horror. These glimpses have allowed me to see myself, and my world, as closer to that reality than I could ever wish.

It’s a hard blessing, to be sure, but one I will not let go of.

D. L. Mayfield is a frequent CT contributor and author of Assimilate or Go Home. Her most recent CT cover story was “Facing Our Legacy of Lynching.” She lives in Portland, Oregon.



Angelina Jolie, Penelope Cruz Feud Made Up

Angelina Jolie Penelope Cruz Feud

(Getty Images)

One of the webloids is attempting to create a feud between Angelina Jolie and Penelope Cruz, but the alleged drama is completely made-up. The bogus article claims Cruz is upset about the fellow actress working with her husband Javier Bardem in the upcoming Bride of Frankenstein remake, but the story is inaccurate on several levels. Gossip Cop can exclusively clear up the situation.

Bardem is on board to star as Frankenstein’s monster in the second film in Universal’s “Dark Universe” franchise, which began with this summer’s The Mummy. The studio wants Jolie for the role of the monster’s bride, but she’s yet to sign on to the project. In fact, recent reports indicated the actress isn’t even in negotiations with Universal just yet. But that didn’t stop RadarOnline from concocting a story saying Cruz is unhappy about her husband’s “working relationship” with Jolie on film’s “set.”

A supposed “insider” tells the site, “Penelope has never been a fan of Angelina’s, partly because of her reputation as a man-eater but also because she considers her a sanctimonious, self-obsessed bore. The idea of her working with Javier gives Penelope the creeps, big time.” The outlet then quotes a so-called “on-set mole” as saying, “There’s an expectation Angie will walk onto this set as queen bee, throwing her ego around and expecting the likes of Javier to act as her underling… He may be okay letting her walk all over him, but Penelope isn’t.”

Once again, not only has shooting on the film yet to begin, but Jolie hasn’t even accepted the role yet. The webloid would know this had it bothered to do a minimal amount of research. Although the majority of the site’s story is provably untrue, Gossip Cop still checked in with a source close to the situation to see if Cruz is put off by the idea of Jolie working with her husband, and we’re exclusively assured that scenario is “false” as well.

Oddly enough, this isn’t the first time Gossip Cop has had to debunk a phony story regarding Jolie’s involvement in the Bride of Frankenstein remake. We recently busted RadarOnline’s sister publication, the National Enquirer, for wrongly reporting Kristen Stewart was replacing Jolie in the title role. That article was entirely untrue and the same goes for this latest one.

Angelina Jolie and Penelope Cruz are feuding.

Thursday, September 21, 2017

Angelina Jolie does it again

Sareum Srey Moch in First They Killed My Father: A Daughter of Cambodia Remembers

Film Title: First The Killed My Father

Director:
Angelina Jolie

Starring:
Sreymoch Sareum, Kompheak Phoeung, Socheata Sveng, Dara Heng, Kimhak Mun

Genre: History

Running Time: 136 min

It’s not as if Angelina Jolie hasn’t proved her worth as a writer-director before now. Following on from the Bosnian war drama In the Land of Blood and Honey, and Unbroken’s harrowing account of life in a second World War prisoner-of-war camp, Jolie’s fourth narrative feature,confirms her as an exquisite craftswoman and an artist capable of tackling geopolitical complexities.

First They Killed My Father, the official Cambodian selection for the Academy Awards, is based on the memoir of the same name by Loung Ung, whom Jolie befriended in 2002 after the actor became a goodwill ambassador for the UN.

 Ung (as essayed by the remarkable Sareum Srey Moch) is the five-year-old daughter of a Cambodian government official (a nuanced Phoeung Kompheak). As the Khmer Rouge’s campaign of genocide begins, Ung and her family are forced to flee Phnom Penh and toil in the fields, where zealous overseers bark slogans: “There will be no banking, no trading and no private property.”

 Jolie stays entirely focused on her young heroine save for an archival overture featuring Richard Nixon. Ung has no real knowledge of the outside world. Her experiences are repetitive, brutal and tempered by naivety: hard labour, surviving on morsels and thin gruel, and finally the dissolution of her family. As the overseers have it: “Angkar is your mother and your father.”

Ironically, once she is conscripted as a child soldier and trained to fight (presumably against PRK communists in the civil war), her diet and living conditions improve.

Her short, horrific military career eventually brings her into a forest where, in a virtuoso sequence, she gingerly inches forward while landmines explode everyone around her into pieces.

Against these harrowing details, Jolie and director of photography Anthony Dod Mantle (Slumdog Millionaire, Antichrist) have crafted a paradoxically balmy, handsome film.

This is both a personal and political project for the director; her 16-year-old Cambodian-born son, Maddox Jolie-Pitt, served as an executive producer.

 Forty years on and the Cambodian genocide has seldom been depicted on film. The Killing Fields was a notable exception but even that exceptional project pivoted around Sam Waterson’s American journalist. Jolie has the clout and integrity to tell the story from a Cambodian perspective. Her ambitions and conviction are matched by an authenticity – a Khmer-speaking cast, hundreds on non-CGI extras – that can’t be manufactured.  Sadly the film’s gravitas and subject matter was always likely to sink it at the box office. It has instead made its way to video on demand. A coup for Netflix, of course, but a loss for the theatrical circuit.

Angelina Jolie follows her passion with ‘First They Killed My Father’

On an early September afternoon, Angelina Jolie sat in a sunlit room in a scenic mountainside hotel, clearly feeling relieved.

The day before, Jolie’s latest directorial effort, the emotionally wrenching Cambodian-genocide drama “First They Killed My Father,” had its North American premiere at the Telluride Film Festival. The crowd gave the film the kind of reception any director would dream of, with cheers and tears in equal measure, while critics took to Twitter to proclaim it Jolie’s best work as a director.

It was an auspicious launch into the awards-season fray for the film, which was released by Netflix on Friday via streaming and in 10 theaters nationwide and has been selected by Cambodia as the country’s official entry for the foreign-language Oscar.

With the screening under her belt, Jolie could now take a breath and take in the rest of the famously low-key festival, which she was attending for the first time with her six children in tow, enjoying the freedom to walk around without being besieged by paparazzi or reporters lobbing prying questions about her recent split from Brad Pitt.

“I geeked out on Ken Burns,” she said brightly, picking at a plate of cheese and crackers beside her longtime friend, Loung Ung, who authored the 2000 memoir “First They Killed My Father” and co-wrote the film’s screenplay with Jolie. “When do you get the chance to do that?”

On its face, “First They Killed My Father” — a child’s-eye view of the horrors of the brutal Khmer Rouge regime that claimed the lives of some 2 million Cambodians — may seem an unlikely project for Jolie to have tackled. The film is entirely in the Khmer language and chronicles events that took place on the other side of the globe when she was just a toddler.

Yet for the 42-year-old actress-turned-director, it is perhaps the most personal film she has made — an attempt to recount a painful chapter in the history of the country where her 16-year-old adopted son, Maddox Jolie-Pitt, was born and where she has put down her own roots over the last two decades.

Jolie and Ung first met some 16 years ago through their work on the issue of land mines in Cambodia. For years, they had talked about someday bringing Ung’s story of surviving the so-called killing fields to the screen. But neither was at all sure it would ever actually happen.

“Loung was in no rush to have the film made, and we knew Maddox needed to be in the right place because he was going to confront a lot,” Jolie said. “He goes to Cambodia a lot, he sees it — but not like that, not in that way. And then one day Mad said that he was ready.”

Jolie’s path to “First They Killed My Father” had begun in 2000, when she traveled to Cambodia to star in a very different kind of film, the action blockbuster “Lara Croft: Tomb Raider.”

“When I got there, I realized I knew nothing about this country and I felt very ignorant,” she said. “I decided to buy a book and learn a little bit so I picked up a $2 copy of ‘First They Killed My Father.’ That was really the beginning of an education and an awareness of how little I knew and how much I needed to change my view of the world.”

Inspired in part by her growing love for Cambodia — where she would eventually buy a house, become a citizen in 2005 and work for environmental conservation, education and other causes — Jolie started working with the United Nations as a goodwill ambassador in 2001, devoting more and more of her time to humanitarian efforts around the world that continue to this day.

Nearly four decades after the genocide ended, the subject is still difficult for many Cambodians to discuss, let alone see reenacted onscreen. But Ung says she was confident that Jolie would be able to do her story justice.

“Angie and I have gone through a lot in our friendship and I trust her as a woman, as a friend, as a filmmaker but also as a mother,” Ung said. “She has a track record, not just with me but with Cambodia and with the world, confronting tough issues of war and peace and refugees. So I knew she was somebody who would understand and pay careful attention and be very kind.”

Still, for Ung, who lost both her parents and two sisters in the genocide, watching the most traumatic events of her life play out onscreen for the first time, with young actress Sareum Srey Moch depicting her journey from carefree 5-year-old to orphaned child soldier to psychologically scarred survivor, was emotionally difficult.

“I went into it willing myself to be strong,” said Ung, who was sponsored by a church group after the war and resettled in Vermont and is now a human-rights activist. “I prepped myself for the hard scenes, the bombs and the soldiers and the land mines. But I found that the scenes that broke me the most were the first scenes with the family sitting down together for dinner. It was as simple as that. To see all nine of us at a table, just eating a meal — moments like that brought it back to what it’s all about, which is the love of family and all of us trying to survive together.”

Shooting the film in Cambodia in what became the largest production in the country since the war, Jolie drew upon every tool she had learned directing her previous features, 2011’s “In the Land of Blood and Honey,” 2014’s “Unbroken” and 2015’s “By the Sea.”

“I think I settled more into a voice,” she said. “Maybe it’s because of Maddox, I don’t know, but I feel like I broke from the box a little bit and I felt bolder in the choices. I think just that little bit more confidence than I had before helped me to stay calm and let things happen on set.”

As for Maddox, Jolie said that working on the film, on which he is credited as an executive producer, put him more deeply in touch with his Cambodian heritage. “I never wanted to press on him that he had to be connected or had to love Cambodia,” she said. “That had to come naturally, and he had to confront a lot of hard realities of what his birth parents had probably lived through. But what happened was, yes, there was a lot to learn but he made something. He created something with his fellow countrymen. He was part of a Cambodian crew, part of a Cambodian film, as a Cambodian.”

Though it’s safe to say that “First They Killed My Father” is not a film that most Hollywood studios would have jumped at the idea of making, Netflix agreed early on to back it. “It is true that this type of film would be difficult to make at a major studio because it it lacks star power and is in a foreign language,” said Scott Stuber, who oversees Netflix’s growing slate of original feature films. “We are fortunate because, for us, we have over 100 million members around the world who have unique and diverse tastes, and we have seen the power of good storytelling traveling globally.”

That said, Jolie is aware that a film about a genocide that took place decades ago in a country many Americans would have difficulty finding on a map may not necessarily be the easiest sell to domestic audiences, particularly these days. As someone who is deeply concerned with the rest of the world, she says the strain of isolationism that has taken hold in this country’s political life troubles her.

“Maybe it’s because I wake up in the morning and my children are from many different countries and we travel in the world,” she said. “I live in the world. I’m proud to be American but I’m also proud to be Cambodian. I’m proud my daughter [Zahara] is Ethiopian. I think America is built on diversity and when we are at our best we are engaging in the world, pushing, representing something. And when we’re not able to do that, the damage that can have — how that spreads into all the other crises and conflicts and human-rights abuses in the world — is something we all need to be very aware of.”

Clearly energized by her experience making “First They Killed My Father,” Jolie said she is eager to find another project to direct. “I prefer being behind the camera,” she said. “I’ve never loved being in front of the camera. I’m much happier when I’m watching other people work.”

But she is looking for the right thing to spark her interest. Asked if she has ever considered trying to tackle a big-budget studio franchise film, like a superhero movie, she paused.

“I don’t know how good I’d be on that,” she said. “Those are more the ones I’d act in — that’s funny, isn’t it? But no, when you give two years of your life, I want to learn something. I want to be immersed in a culture or be learning about history.

“To direct something, you have to be so passionate. You have to live and die for it if you want to make it great. Some people are passionate about those big entertainment ones or new technologies. I’m passionate about country and culture and human beings.”

josh.rottenberg@latimes.com

Twitter: @joshrottenberg

Angelina Jolie Loses Control of Her Kids, “Overwhelmed” Without Brad Pitt

Things post-divorce are panning out to be trickier than Angelina Jolie may have thought. In the wake of her devastating split from her husband of three years, Brad Pitt, Angelina’s house — which she shares with her six children — has become chaotic, In Touch has exclusively learned. With organization and upkeep never being Angelina’s strong suit, things are more out of sorts in the Jolie-Pitt home than ever.

Angelina recently bought a massive estate in Los Angele’s Los Feliz neighborhood. When she, Maddox, 16, Pax, 13, Zahara, 12, Shiloh, 11, and nine-year-old twins Knox and Vivienne moved into the California mansion, mama Jolie promised the kids “they could all decorate their rooms,” a family insider reveals to In Touch. Recently, Angelina admitted that, “[Decorating] was always Brad’s thing.”

The result of Angelina’s lack of interest in decorating and lax attitude is trashed rooms and no rules. “[It’s] a cross between a trashed frat house and a DayGlo-covered rave club,” the source reveals.

Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie Kids Getty Images

Chaos ensues as the Jolie-Pitts try to make their way through an airport.
(Photo Credit: Getty Images)

“It’s a house of horrors,” the source continues. Despite the mansion boasting six bedrooms, 10 bathrooms, and questionable decor, it’s the kids’ reign over the place that’s really adding fuel to the fire. It’s a move that’s characteristic of Angelina’s carefree parenting style but one that also seems to be backfiring. But the chaos isn’t just happening behind closed doors. Earlier this summer, Shiloh and Vivienne Jolie-Pitt were spotted walking barefoot through a Target parking lot looking very unkept.

Another source, close to Brad, insists that Angelina is feeling “overwhelmed” in LA, despite Brad only living a few blocks away. “Angelina has lost control. It’s shocking what goes on in this house,” the family source continues.

With so much going on post-divorce, an insider close to Angelina reveals the Oscar winner is having a difficult time finding her happiness. “Overall, it’s a desperately lonely, difficult existence for Angelina right now,” the source tells In Touch.

The family insider reveals that the kids’ decor weapon of choice is a handful of crayons. “They express themselves by scribbling and coloring on the walls,” the source explains. This destruction-slash-artistry is nothing new. After all, Angelina famously allowed her children to decorate her 2014 wedding gown and their $60 million estate in France was reportedly wrecked with the damage done when children wield crayons. The Brad source says, “Crews came in to repair the damage. So the next time they came back, it would be in pristine condition.”

This time around, however, Angelina doesn’t have the luxury of a clean-up crew. “Food and water fights and soccer games inside the house remain the norm,” the family insider reveals. The single mom of six is certainly in over her head, according to family sources. “Angelina has no clue what she is doing. There are absolutely no rules,” the source alleges.

And with “no rules,” comes no bedtimes. In the Jolie household, bedtimes simply don’t exist. “It’s not uncommon for all of the kids to be up past midnight during the week, eating sugary snacks and soda,” the Brad source says. “They go to bed very, very late and end up sleeping in very late the next day.”

But bedtimes aren’t the only way the children let loose. “The kids delight in letting loose their collection of animals — a number of dogs, cats, hamsters, snakes,” the family insider continues. And no visitor is safe — not even one employed by mom! “The kids have been openly defiant and unmanageable when it comes to tutors and nannies,” the Brad source concurs. “The nannies have no control when it comes to the kids. They pretty much run them. It’s a case of lunatics taking over the asylum.”

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Angelina with sons Maddox and Pax. (Photo Credit: Getty Images)

So in the wake of splitting up from her longtime partner, how is Angelina handling the changes of becoming a single mom? Close sources say, not well. “Although she’s maternal, as much as she wants to be, Angie’s not good at being a homemaker,” the Angelina insider says. “She can barely get breakfast on the table.”

“Juggling basic caregiving and daily schedules that include playdates, doctor’s appointments, and organizing meal times for her brood is all too much to her,” the source continues. It’s a weakness even Angie herself has admitted to.

“Sometimes maybe it appears I am pulling it all together,” Angelina said in a recent interview, “but really I am just trying to get through my days… I’m not as strong inside as I have been int he past. I don’t enjoy being single. It’s not something I wanted.”

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Enigmatic and unbroken, Angelina Jolie talks about life after Brad

Angelina Jolie is sitting barefoot on the porch of her luscious new home, explaining why she wants to save the world, when duty calls. Her youngest son, Knox, 9, pokes his little blond head around the screen door. “Shiloh needs you,” the boy says quietly, referring to his middle sister, who is 11.

“Shi?” Jolie calls, before disappearing with a whoosh of her black caftan. Ten minutes later, she is back. Shiloh’s beloved bearded dragon, Vlad, has fallen ill and is now, to Shiloh’s distress, convalescing at the vet’s. “That will be the rest of my day,” Jolie says, settling into a cushioned patio chair, “learning all about the health issues of the bearded dragon.”

Jolie goes on to lament the imbalance of a world where Californian pets get cushy care while millions of people the world over lack access to proper medical treatment. It goes unmentioned that she was saying this from her $25m (£18m) two-acre hilltop estate, in a gated pocket of the Los Feliz neighborhood, a home she bought for herself and her six children in the spring, after her split from Brad Pitt.

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Jolie greeting children in Cambodia (Tom Stoddart/Getty

Perhaps more than any other celebrity, Jolie, 42, has kept herself firmly planted in two vastly different worlds. She’s the glamorous A-lister whose every move is tracked in headlines (“Angie and the kids left Target because it didn’t serve hot dogs,” read one recent news flash), and the humanitarian do-gooder who has made more than 60 trips to the field as part of her United Nations work. Apparent contradictions account for her elusive allure. Jolie has been enduringly hard to peg, a woman who cannot easily be lumped into a single category because she occupies many at once.

She is a peerless glamazon as well as the women’s health advocate who told the world about her preventive double mastectomy. She has a meticulously managed public profile yet professes not to care what others think. She remains near the pinnacle of celebrity’s cruel pyramid, even though her recent movies only made money when she was camouflaged (Maleficent, Kung Fu Panda). She is obsessed over – if, in the United States at least, not exactly beloved – and fixed in the cultural firmament as America’s vixen despite having a half-dozen-strong brood.

And even though the public appetite for salacious details of her personal life has long eclipsed interest in the films she has directed, Jolie doggedly brings tough, obscure stories to the screen. Three of the four movies she has made are set in wartime, including her latest, First They Killed My Father, based on the true story of Loung Ung, who as a young girl survived the Cambodian genocide and is now one of Jolie’s close friends.

While Jolie’s earlier movies garnered tepid reviews, several critics have anointed First They Killed My Father her best yet. It is told entirely from the little girl’s point of view, in Khmer, and received a standing ovation at the Telluride Film Festival, where it had its premiere. Netflix was to begin streaming it on 15 September, when it will also open in a small number of theatres.

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Happier times: A-listers Jolie and Pitt at a press conference in 2006 in Namibia to announce the adoption of daughter Shiloh (AFP/Getty)

Jolie said she could not have made the movie had she not first directed In the Land of Blood and Honey (2011) about the Bosnian war, and Unbroken (2014), based on the true story of an American GI taken prisoner in the Second World War. (She and Pitt starred together as a married couple locked in a different kind of conflict in her 2015 drama, By the Sea).

“It wasn’t a conscious plan of, I was going to make war films, it’s just what I was drawn to,” she said.

Jolie has an indelible connection to Cambodia, not least because it completely reordered her life. Before first visiting in 2000 to shoot Lara Croft: Tomb Raider, she had been a Hollywood wild child, a ravishing Goth weirdo who, at the Oscars that year, dressed like Elvira, Mistress of the Dark, and locked lips with her brother. She also got publicly hot and heavy with her second husband, Billy Bob Thornton, and wore a locket with droplets of his blood.

The grace and humility she saw in the Cambodian people, along with the lasting effects of the genocide, threw Hollywood life into unflattering relief.

“Once you get exposed to what’s really happening in the world, and other people’s realities, you just can’t ever not know, and you can’t ever wake up and pretend it’s not happening,” she says, “Your entire life shifts.”

She adopted Maddox, now 16, from an orphanage, divorced Thornton, and threw herself into humanitarian and environmental work, finding lasting inspiration in wartime survivors and aid workers.

“The real will to survive, and the strength of the human spirit, and the love of the human family becomes so present, and that’s how we should all be living,” Jolie says. “When you’re around it, it’s quite contagious, and you know to learn from it.”

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Jolie calls for action on World Refugee Day in June 2016, with Secretary of State John Kerry (AP)

The air presses in hot and close as she speaks, and the sun is climbing its way toward a broiling midday. I am all but keeling over, but Jolie, who adores the heat, is as composed as a sphinx. (We soon move to the air-conditioned climes of her kitchen.)

Jolie is a contained and poised presence, yet also light, breaking every now and then into lilting laughter. She is as visually arresting as she appears onscreen; the sculpted lines of her face alongside the soft O’s of her eyes and mouth make hers an otherworldly beauty. Though slight as a sylph, she says she doesn’t exercise, beyond dipping into the pool with her kids and vaguely intending to someday jump on a treadmill.

Although it was still August, the children — Maddox, Pax, 13, Zahara, 12, Shiloh, Knox and his twin, Vivienne — had already begun home school. They would be accompanying her to the Telluride and Toronto film festivals — Maddox has an executive producer credit on the film — and were making up for lost lesson time, working with tutors in various corners of the house, learning, among other things, Arabic, sign language and physics.

I asked Jolie if she ever felt like the coach of a small team, and she replied that more often she felt part of a fraternity. “They really help me so much. We’re really such a unit,” she said. “They’re the best friends I’ve ever had. Nobody in my life has ever stood by me more.”

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UNHCR special envoy Angelina Jolie at a news conference during her visit to Syrian refugees in the Bekaa valley, Lebanon 

That last sentence hung in the air, perhaps a subtle allusion to, or indictment of, Pitt, who adopted Maddox, Pax and Zahara, and is the biological father of Shiloh, Knox and Vivienne. The dissolution of their 12-year romantic partnership came last September, after an incident aboard a private jet — purportedly involving Pitt and Maddox — prompted her to file for divorce.

Shortly afterward, Jolie and the kids moved out of Pitt’s estate, living in a rental for nine months as she struggled with the decision about whether to buy a new home. “It took me a few months to realise that I was really going to have to do it. That there was going to have to be another base regardless of everything,” she said, her voice falling quiet and low, as it would each time the subject of the split arose. “That there was going to have to be a home. Another home.”

The new house, a Beaux-Arts manse that was once the residence of legendary filmmaker Cecil B DeMille, is a beauty, with a library, rolling lawns, cascading fountains that burble into the pool, and a view of the Griffith Observatory. Jolie had an elaborate treehouse built – “more a parkour treehouse,” she says – and the kids helped decorate and pick out the furniture for the whole house. They have an agreement, Jolie says, that not everyone can agree on everything, but you have to try to like it if you don’t hate it. If you do hate it, you can overrule.

“It has a lot of moments,” Jolie says of the home, “It’s happy. Happy and light, and we needed that.”

I asked how everyone is doing now. “None of it’s easy. It’s very, very difficult, a very painful situation, and I just want my family healthy,” she says quietly.

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Jolie hints that the movie ‘First They Killed My Father’ informed her decision to leave Pitt

Are they? “They’re getting better,” she says, her voice approaching inaudibility.

She intimated that First They Killed My Father might have informed her decision to leave Pitt. The film centres on Ung’s family members, some of whom survived, and Jolie said she thought a lot about what family meant during production, and how they should help each other and take care of one another (the film is adapted from Ung’s 2000 book of the same name).

“Loung had such horrors in her life but also had so much love, and that is why she’s all right today,” Jolie says. “That is something I need to remember.”

Determined to make the film as Cambodian as possible, Jolie teamed with Cambodian director Rithy Panh, who received an Oscar nomination for his 2014 documentary, The Missing Picture, and enlisted thousands of Cambodians as extras. Jolie said Maddox was her right-hand man, working on the script, taking meeting notes and bantering with Panh in French. Some of the scenes were shot on massacre sites, so the crew arranged for monks to pray and set out incense and offerings beforehand.

“She is very loved there,” says Panh, who served as a producer on the film. He added that he was struck by Jolie’s humility, and how she intuitively communicated with the children on set, despite her shaky grasp of the Cambodian language. (Jolie said a suggestion in Vanity Fair that children were cruelly hoodwinked in the casting process was “a mischaracterisation”.)

Ung says Jolie, who has Cambodian citizenship, shares her countrymen’s sensibilities. “In Cambodia you don’t raise your voice, you speak kindly to people, you greet people with your hands together and bow,” Ung says. “All of this comes naturally to her.”

As our interview wraps, Jolie jokes that she would next work on a comedy. “I will get funny at some point,” she says, adding that she was working on Maleficent 2, a sequel to the Disney fractured fairy tale. “That was a little funny,” she says, wryly.

Jolie also seems aware of how she might be beheld by the public; the removed ice queen to Pitt’s affable down-home Missouri boy (his revealing interview in the summer issue of GQ Style helped burnish his image as the more relatable one). But she grew up a punk in school, she says, and was used to not fitting in, and being someone people had opinions about.

“I never expect to be the one that everybody understands or likes,” Jolie says, walking me down her driveway, “and that’s OK, because I know who I am, and the kids know who I am.”

She quickly embraces me goodbye, and I set off into the sun and the heat, as the heavy security gate slowly drew shut behind.

© New York Times


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Angelina Jolie and a Searing AIDS Drama Eye Foreign Film Oscars

It’s Tuesday, and I thought last night’s 3.6-magnitude earthquake in mid-L.A. was just the sound of Rex Reed walking out of Mother!

Hello from Los Angeles, where we’re watching Oscar’s foreign-language race heat up, channeling Shonda Rhimes as she channels Oprah Winfrey, and scratching our heads about John Stamos’s next big gig.

BONJOUR, OSCAR

Major players in Oscar’s foreign-language category are starting to stake out their territories, ahead of the Academy’s October 2 submission deadline. On Monday, Cambodia selected Angelina Jolie’s child’s-eye view of the Khmer Rouge era, First They Killed My Father, as its official submission. Though Jolie has held dual American/Cambodian citizenship since 2005, the choice of a Western woman director to represent the Southeast Asian country is unusual, and brings both the actress’s star power and Netflix’s deep pocketbook to the foreign-language race. Meanwhile, the French Oscar committee has picked Robin Campillo’s AIDS activism drama BPM (Beats Per Minute) to represent the country over Michel Hazanavicius’s Jean-Luc Godard tribute, Redoutable, Screendaily’s Melanie Goodfellow reports. BPM, which The Orchard will release stateside, won the Grand Prix at Cannes and major plaudits from critics—including’s V.F.’s Richard Lawson, who called it “broadly enlightening and piercingly intimate.” Also in the mix are Ruben Östlund’s Swedish Palme d’Or-winning art-world satire, The Square (Magnolia), and Sebastián Lelio’s Chilean transgender drama A Fantastic Woman (Sony Pictures Classics). The Academy has grown more international with its two recent classes of invitees—how the increasingly global group evaluates its most cosmopolitan category will be something to watch.

GOING TO SHONDALAND

V.F.’s Yohana Desta writes:

On Sunday night, Shonda Rhimes—like many of us—watched as stars like Lena Waithe, Donald Glover, and Riz Ahmed made Emmys history. Waithe became the first black woman to win for comedy writing, Glover the first black man to win for comedy directing, and Ahmed the first Asian man to win a drama acting statuette. But while Rhimes—a triple nominee herself who somehow still hasn’t won an Emmy—was happy to see progress being made, she finds it painful that we’re still marking firsts like these in 2017. “It’s embarrassing, frankly,” she told me in an interview Monday. “It feels embarrassing that we are still in a place in which we still have to note these moments.” Hear, hear! Rhimes herself is at the forefront of changing the industry in this regard, pushing inclusive stories about powerful, but complex women who steer their own ships. In our chat, she discussed the importance of pushing back against the Old White Men Rooms at studios, her new Web site, her career-driving Oprah advice, and her gig as the creative director for Dove’s Real Beauty Productions.

TOO SPICEY

V.F.’s Laura Bradley writes:

You know what they say: if you can’t take the heat, keep Sean Spicer out of your kitchen. CBS’s late-night hosts, Stephen Colbert and James Corden, both landed in hot water on Sunday night and Monday morning thanks to the former press secretary. Colbert’s choice to bring Spicer on stage at the Emmys was met with immediate backlash, while a photo of Corden kissing Spicer on the cheek at an after-party went viral—and not in a good, Carpool Karaoke kind of way. Both hosts have been accused of normalizing Spicer. Colbert reportedly knew the joke would be controversial, and it seems likely he’ll address it on Tuesday’s Late Show—his first new broadcast in over a week. As for Corden, he apologized on his own show Monday night, joking, “I need to learn now to shake hands.” That apology—which mixed humor with sincerity to somewhat confusing effect—might not be enough for some critics, but we’ll see how much damage control Corden really has to do, if any, when ratings come out.

SING OUT, STAMOS!

V.F.’s Hillary Busis writes:

Who will give me a golden ticket to Los Angeles, so that I might witness what sounds like it could be the most-bonkers event ever to hit the Hollywood Bowl? On November 3 and 4, the venue will play host to a live celebration of Willy Wonka & the Chocolate Factory, featuring Stranger Things and It standout Finn Wolfhard as Charlie Bucket, sultry singer (and daughter of Rob Schneider) Elle King as Veruca Salt, Giancarlo Esposito (!) as the Candy Man, Weird Al Yankovic as the Oompa Loompas (!!), and—get this—John Stamos as Willy Wonka. I know. I know. The production will also be presented with “Smell-O-Rama,” whatever that means. (Apparently, scratch-and-sniff golden tickets are involved.) Erin Nyren from Variety has the full rundown of details, but really—even knowing just that much, are you not entertained?

GAGA OPENS UP

Described out of its Toronto International Film Festival premiere as “searingly raw” and “surprisingly emotional” by V.F.’s own Julie Miller, the Netflix documentary Lady Gaga: Five Foot Two has debuted a new trailer that reveals just how intimate a glimpse it is into the life of the pop star. “Paranoia, fear, body pain, anxiety,” Gaga tells Beats 1 host Zane Lowe about her reasons for being out of the spotlight in recent years. Having recently postponed her world tour due to “severe physical pain,” Gaga is opening up about her personal life more than ever before, and the documentary—which debuts on the service September 22—appears to be a major part of that process. Watch the full new trailer here.

That’s the news for this overcast Tuesday in L.A. What are seeing out there? Send tips, comments, and Everlasting Gobstoppers to Rebecca_Keegan@condenast.com. Follow me on Twitter @thatrebecca.

Angelina Jolie has found a powerful voice as a director. It’s time we listened | Bidisha | Opinion

Just how many powerful, impressive films does a woman need to make before she’s taken seriously? In Angelina Jolie’s case the answer is four, over a timespan of six years. Her most recent, First They Killed My Father: A Daughter of Cambodia Remembers, has just been announced as Cambodia’s official entry for the foreign language category at the Oscars, following a successful premiere at the Telluride Film Festival. Based on Loung Ung’s memoir, it stars Srey Moch as the young protagonist trying to survive the genocidal violence, forced child conscription and labour camps of the Khmer Rouge’s terrorisation of civilians in Cambodia in the 1970s.

The reviews have been very good, although the wider world seems baffled as to why one of the most beautiful women on the planet would value politics, internationalism and human rights activism over prettiness, Hollywood privilege and American insularity; why she would want to speak and create rather than be gawped at. In Jolie’s case her commitment, lack of dilettantism and the evident political seriousness of her outlook have prevented her from being trashed outright – as Madonna was for her beautiful-looking, intelligent and delicate film WE, say – but her work has still been erased, ignored, talked down, picked apart in countless petty ways and ultimately dismissed. Two decades into her career, she is still not seen as a heavyweight.

It’s disappointing, because in Jolie’s work both as a film director and a stateswoman she is propelled by the single most important impulse behind the global fight for women’s liberation: confronting endemic male violence against women, girls, boys and men. Her 2011 debut, In the Land of Blood and Honey, is one of the best war films I’ve ever seen. Focusing on the Bosnian war of the 1990s, it shows conflict as ugly, nihilistic and unjust, riven with frenzied male sexual violence against women and macho abuse and one-upmanship even between men ostensibly on the same side. Jolie looks where other people refuse to, shooting scenes of men raping and brutalising women unflinchingly, realistically and with no titillation whatsoever. It’s a shocking, visceral, deeply feminist film, led by the actress Zana Marjanović who plays a prisoner of war who attains some sort of sick “special status” as the sexual possession of a soldier whom she knew before the war. Repulsively, the film is billed on Wikipedia as an “American romantic drama” and “a love story” when it is the precise opposite: a serious depiction of the way human connections are twisted by mental, political and physical violence.

Of course most war films, whoever they are directed by, depict conflict as brutal, unjust, callous and grievously wasteful of human life. But relatively few include women as plentiful or significant characters or make the obvious gendered point that it is men, not women, who are the perpetrators of virtually all the world’s violence in “peacetime” as well as war; and that it is women and children who must suffer, unasked, through the acts and consequences of men’s violence.

Jolie excels when she puts the experiences of women and girls in the spotlight. Her second film, Unbroken, in 2014, was a solid biopic of Louis Zamperini, the former Japanese prisoner of war who became an Olympic runner. It was well made, but stately and too worshipful of its subject.

Unbroken was superseded by her much smaller film, By the Sea, in 2015. Based somewhat on Jolie’s parents’ marriage but also redolent of Gena Rowlands’ work with John Cassavetes, it tells the story of a couple pulled apart by grief after two miscarriages, which causes them to act out in various unflattering and perverse ways. Although this luxury arthouse work is anomalous in terms of Jolie’s much wider interests as a director, By the Sea marks her out as an auteur who can create stunningly beautiful work that balances sumptuous design with (particularly female) emotional torment. In one scene Jolie’s character Nessa tells her husband, played by Jolie’s then-husband Brad Pitt: “Maybe you shouldn’t have a drink today. It’ll be good for you.” Clearly Brad didn’t listen. And have you heard him speaking French, as he does throughout the film? Oof – it’s like overhearing an upstairs neighbour struggling to move heavy furniture.

I love By the Sea, but it’s a gorgeous curio when set alongside the rest of her output. In returning to the bigger, more heavily political canvas of First They Killed My Father, Jolie reconnects with her prior body of work and looks afresh at the often disregarded collateral damage of male warfare: women and children. Let’s hope the world is ready to listen this time.

Bidisha is a journalist and author

Angelina Jolie’s ‘First They Killed My Father’ Is Ambitious but Boring

There are two Angelina Jolies. There’s Angelina Jolie, the Oscar winner and Hollywood star, goddess of the Vanity Fair cover pose, reveler in the ups and downs of celebrity and public perception. And then there’s Angelina Jolie, the activist and ambassador, a woman who would seem by trade to hover, graciously, above her First World self.

It’s trite to pretend these two personas are drastically different. There are, to begin with, plenty of precedents for activist-celebrities. And it was, after all, Angelina the star who, while filming Lara Croft: Tomb Raider in Cambodia in 2000, discovered her love of activism and, specifically, of that country. In Siem Reap, Angelina the star happened upon a book on the side of the road being sold for $2. It was First They Killed My Father: A Daughter of Cambodia Remembers, written by Loung Ung, a childhood survivor of the devastating Cambodian genocide that, carried out by the Khmer Rouge from 1975 to 1979, resulted in the killing of an estimated 1.7 million people: nearly a quarter of the country’s population. Seventeen years later, Jolie has made that book into a movie.

First They Killed My Father: A Daughter of Cambodia Remembers, which debuted on Netflix on Friday, is Jolie’s fourth turn behind the camera as a feature film director and her third as a chronicler of war. Her first, which she also wrote and produced, was In the Land of Blood and Honey (2011), a romantic drama set in Sarajevo amid the Bosnian War. The next was 2014’s Unbroken—another war drama, this time chronicling Olympian Louis Zamperini’s time as a POW in Japan after surviving at sea on a raft for 47 days. These projects are ambitious, well-chosen, and a little boring. Her new film, which is the best of the three, nevertheless furthers that trend.

Well made but frustratingly impersonal, First They Killed My Father is mired in a sense of respectful, admiring distance. It is almost entirely told from the perspective of Ung herself, who’s 7 in the movie, and whose flashbacks throughout attempt to anchor the proceedings—which begin with her family being forcibly evacuated from their home in Phnom Penh, where Ung’s father worked as a high-ranking government official—in some sense of who she is. But all the point-of-view shots in the world won’t add up to inner life or individual character without a more rigorous sense of who the subject is. And Jolie’s film, despite its good intentions, has little sense of who the genocide’s victims are. It’s a movie that privileges the history of what happened over a sense of the people it was happening to.


Still of a crowd in ‘First They Killed My Father’

‘First They Killed My Father’
Netflix

Jolie’s movie typically sees those victims as a huge anonymous mass of roving refugees. Clustered together as families, these people are, for the most part, unlikely to survive. Otherwise, they’re the soldiers themselves, who are indistinct by choice: The Angkar, the ruling party of communist rebels, did not believe in individuality. But everyone else did. Hence the dissatisfaction of peering into a face like Ung’s when the movie reduces her to a silent witness. She’s a little girl who stands in for many—too many. And her immediate family—four siblings, her mother, and her father—are equally indistinct. They have no character, no ideas, no experiences beyond their pain. This is fiction filmmaking that, despite occasionally feverish editing and a few gracefully askew shots, nevertheless aspires to documentary plainness. No amount of jumpy impressionism—one of Jolie’s more tired stylistic ticks as a director—distracts from the bland predictability of the movie’s ethics. First They Killed My Father is, adamantly, a film that believes that by merely documenting atrocities through the eyes of those who witnessed them, it can also, automatically, sell itself as a movie about those witnesses.

It is, in other words, a run-of-the-mill liberal atrocity film. Call it Nick Kristof cinema, or perhaps Angelina the activist cinema—which is why news of the exploitative strategies Jolie’s team used to cast the child actors is not so surprising and is even less ironic. This approach is too common a trend to be disappointing in itself (and, in fact, the last major movie on Cambodia to make a mark in the United States, 1984’s The Killing Fields, suffered from similar problems). But for Jolie, it’s a disappointing return to form on the heels of By the Sea, which remains her best film as a director—as well as her most vain.

Maybe there’s something to that. By the Sea, which Jolie made with her husband, Brad Pitt, is only two years old, and it can’t help but feel like the prescient document of a marriage that’s about to fail. The movie was accused of being a “132-minute perfume ad,” and so be it: The premise of perfume ads is to sell you on the idea that glamour, an alternative to blemishes and failure, can be bought. The premise of By the Sea is, to the contrary, that there’s no antidote to a blemish, especially one undermining a marriage.

Hence the pending divorce? By the Sea is about a struggling writer (Pitt) and his fashionable, ex-dancer wife (Jolie) escaping to France to, well, wallow in their bored grief. They fight, they drink, they spy on the couple next door through a hole in the wall. We in the audience, meanwhile, find ourselves peering through the surface of the movie at the real-life couple onscreen. The movie has its share of clumsy conceits, but it’s weirdly fraught and occasionally even thrilling. Pitt and Jolie camping out by a wall with wine and dinner trays to watch another couple have sex, then turning inward toward their characters’ (or is it their own?) discontent gets much more of a rise out of Jolie’s direction than anything in her films about war.

Her war films aren’t strictly impersonal: Insofar as her philanthropy is tied up in her persona, each of Jolie’s films as a director is, in a way, “personal.” Furthermore, in the case of First They Killed My Father, Jolie’s adopted son, Maddox, is a descendant of this atrocity. It’s a worthy subject, one she cares deeply about. And it’s possible, seeing her celebrity in this context, that Jolie’s instinct is mostly to make this kind of project while shying away from making movies about herself. However, on the evidence of her movies, she has much more to say about herself than about anything else. And that’s OK! First They Killed My Father may be Jolie’s passion project; but By the Sea is, by some margin, the more passionate one.

I’m torn on what that means for First They Killed My Father, which is more worthwhile to watch for what it’s about and more worthwhile to talk about because of who made it, than it is because of its merits. The movie, which is almost entirely in the language of Khmer, has been chosen as Cambodia’s entry to the Best Foreign Language film category at the Oscars, which, at the very least, means Jolie has earned some of that country’s respect. “I cannot find words to express what it means to me that I was entrusted with telling part of the story of this country,” she said at the film’s premiere in Cambodia this February. Being entrusted with this story is indeed an honor. Jolie doesn’t squander it. But she also fails to make much of it.

Angelina Jolie’s First They Killed My Father To Be Cambodia Oscar Entry

UPDATE, writethru after Sunday 11:01 PM exclusive: Angelina Jolie’s First They Killed My Father has been set as the Cambodian submission for the Best Foreign Language Film Oscar. Deadline reported late Sunday night that confirmation of the selection was imminent, and early Monday morning the Cambodia Oscar Selection Committee made it official. The Netflix title, directed and co-written by Jolie, is about author and human rights activist Loung Ung’s life under the rule of the deadly Khmer Rouge. It premiered in Telluride and then went on to Toronto where it won strong praise. The story is told through Ung’s eyes, from the age of five, when the Khmer Rouge came to power.

First They Killed My Father’s selection as the foreign language entry marks the first time such a high-profile American director has been the representative of another country in another tongue. It is also the 6th submission ever from Cambodia where the film held a premiere in February and was released September 8 in local theaters.

Jolie said in a statement today, “This means a great deal to all of us involved in making the film. To work with local artists to bring this story forward has been a moving and humbling experience.” Added Ung, “We were together when we received the news and it was very emotional. This has been a long journey for me, and while it is personal, it is also reflective of the experience of millions of Cambodians. We are very proud to be representing Cambodia as this year’s selection and share this moment with the country.”

Since 2005, Jolie has held dual U.S./Cambodian nationality. Her passion project was shot entirely in the country with an all-local cast. According to the Khmer Times, the film has been “hailed as a technical milestone for the local film industry, with the production employing thousands of Cambodian artisans, technicians and extras.”

In the U.S., First They Killed My Father was released theatrically on September 15 in the Top 10 markets, the same day it launched globally on Netflix.

The streaming service’s Ted Sarandos was asked by Deadline’s Pete Hammond recently about plans to have this film submitted by Cambodia for the FL Oscar contest, and he said he was confident it would happen. Jolie said the fact that First They Killed My Father might be submitted by the current regime was remarkable considering some of the things going on there now including attempts to shut down some of the media. “I am a western woman and it would be amazing if they could agree to send our film (to the Academy),” she said, adding it would be a powerful and surprising message of unified support from the government. Her son Maddox, whom she adopted in Cambodia in 2002, has an executive producer credit on the movie.

Jolie produces with Cambodian filmmaker Rithy Panh whose 2013 The Missing Picture was nominated in the Foreign Language race. That film was an autobiographical documentary — told entirely with clay figures — about Panh’s experiences growing up under the Khmer Rouge.

Panh said today, “I am very happy, and very proud, that First They Killed My Father was selected by the Cambodia Oscar Selection Committee to represent Cambodia. Because the film is original and powerful. Because thousands of us participated in the film’s making and so, too, in writing a chapter of Cambodia’s collective history. And because this history doesn’t belong only to the Cambodia people; it is universal. Cinema also is a way to talk about the resilience and dignity of human beings.”

While there isn’t a clear line on the nationalities or places of birth of directors of the roughly 1,800 films entered in the Foreign Language category since 1956, one other U.S.-born helmer stands out: Rama Burshtein was behind the 2012 Israeli submission, Fill The Void.

Since the 1984 (57th) Awards, the rules for the category have stipulated that a submitting country “must certify that creative talent of that country exercised artistic control of the film.”

Angelina Jolie looks radiant in black and white in LA

Angelina Jolie expertly balances her life as a mom, filmmaker and humanitarian.

And the mother-of-six looked effortlessly elegant donning a white blouse teamed, dark A-line skirt and nude pumps Sunday in LA.

Ever the crowd pleaser, the actress/activist took time to sign autographs and chat with fans after an already lengthy Q&A about her directorial project First They Killed My Father at the Academy Of Motion Arts.

She's a classic! Angelina Jolie looked effortlessly elegant in monochrome separates Sunday after a screening of her film First They Killed My Father at the Academy Of Motion Arts in LA

She's a classic! Angelina Jolie looked effortlessly elegant in monochrome separates Sunday after a screening of her film First They Killed My Father at the Academy Of Motion Arts in LA

She’s a classic! Angelina Jolie looked effortlessly elegant in monochrome separates Sunday after a screening of her film First They Killed My Father at the Academy Of Motion Arts in LA

The ex of actor Brad Pitt looked stylishly enchanting as she stepped out the event in a chic monochrome set.

Angelina, 42, remained poised while covering her eyes with square sunglasses and sweeping her dark locks to one side elegantly.

The California girl displayed jewelry-free hands while carrying two handy Sharpies to sign posters and memorabilia.

Cool cat: The ex of actor Brad Pitt looked poised as can be while covering her eyes with square sunglasses and sweeping her dark locks to one side elegantly

Cool cat: The ex of actor Brad Pitt looked poised as can be while covering her eyes with square sunglasses and sweeping her dark locks to one side elegantly

Cool cat: The ex of actor Brad Pitt looked poised as can be while covering her eyes with square sunglasses and sweeping her dark locks to one side elegantly

Sharp signature! The California girl displayed jewelry-free hands while carrying two handy Sharpies to sign posters and memorabilia

Sharp signature! The California girl displayed jewelry-free hands while carrying two handy Sharpies to sign posters and memorabilia

Sharp signature! The California girl displayed jewelry-free hands while carrying two handy Sharpies to sign posters and memorabilia

Fan favorite: The Academy Award winner has been busy promoting her heartbreaking new project First They Killed My Father recently

Fan favorite: The Academy Award winner has been busy promoting her heartbreaking new project First They Killed My Father recently

Fan favorite: The Academy Award winner has been busy promoting her heartbreaking new project First They Killed My Father recently

Recently, the Academy Award winner has been busy promoting her heartbreaking new project First They Killed My Father.

Earlier Saturday, Angelina sported a loose white dress and fringed duster jacket to another LA screening of the film she produced, wrote and directed. 

On Thursday, the UN Ambassador donned a similar look while in New York City for a stop by the United Nations HQ.

Star with a heart: The UN Ambassador donned a similar look while in New York City Thursday, where the humanitarian stopped by the United Nations HQ

Star with a heart: The UN Ambassador donned a similar look while in New York City Thursday, where the humanitarian stopped by the United Nations HQ

Star with a heart: The UN Ambassador donned a similar look while in New York City Thursday, where the humanitarian stopped by the United Nations HQ

Live through this: Angie's stirring new project tells the story of author and human rights activist Loung Ung's life through flashbacks of life under the Khmer Rouge dictatorship

Live through this: Angie's stirring new project tells the story of author and human rights activist Loung Ung's life through flashbacks of life under the Khmer Rouge dictatorship

Live through this: Angie’s stirring new project tells the story of author and human rights activist Loung Ung’s life through flashbacks of life under the Khmer Rouge dictatorship

There, she donned the same style blouse along with a pocketed pencil skirt in a savory brown hue.

First They Killed My Father: A Daughter of Cambodia Remembers tells the story of author and human rights activist Loung Ung’s life through flashbacks of life under the Khmer Rouge dictatorship.

The stirring biopic is already garnering rave reviews and is currently available to stream on Netflix. 

Ready to watch: The Jolie directed First They Killed My Father: A Daughter of Cambodia Remembers  is already garnering rave reviews and is currently available to stream on Netflix

Ready to watch: The Jolie directed First They Killed My Father: A Daughter of Cambodia Remembers  is already garnering rave reviews and is currently available to stream on Netflix

Ready to watch: The Jolie directed First They Killed My Father: A Daughter of Cambodia Remembers is already garnering rave reviews and is currently available to stream on Netflix

Wanda Sykes on Daily Show Encounter with Angelina Jolie

Wanda Sykes — like most of the rest of the world, probably — had trouble keeping herself together in the presence of Angelina Jolie.

As the actress and comedian explained to PeopleTV on the Emmys red carpet on Sunday in Los Angeles, she and Jolie once had a run-in backstage at The Daily Show when it was hosted by Jon Stewart.

“Angelina was there and she was walking out of the restroom, and I had to go into the restroom and she was like, ‘Hi Wanda, I’m Angie,’ ” Sykes, 53, recounted to PEOPLE’s JD Heyman and Lola Ogunnaike, host of Entertainment Weekly: The Show.

“And I was just so memorized, but I just said, ‘I gotta pee,’ and that was it,” Sykes continued of her run-in with the 42-year-old Maleficent star. “So that was pretty awful.”

Sykes, who was a nominee this year for a guest-turn on ABC’s black-ish, said on the carpet that she’ll be able to take it easy during the show on Sunday night as her category’s winner was announced last week at the 69th Primetime Creative Arts Emmy Awards.

“So now I just get to relax and root on my friends at black-ish,” she said.

For full Emmys coverage, click here

Dozens of A-listers have descended on Hollywood for TV’s biggest night, the 2017 Emmy Awards. Some of the biggest shows will be battling it out for the night’s top awards, including The Crown, Better Call Saul, The Handmaid’s Tale, House of Cards, Stranger Things, This Is Us and Westworld for outstanding drama series and Atlanta, black-ish, Master of None, Modern Family, Silicon Valley, Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt and Veep for outstanding comedy series.

• Watch the full episode of PEOPLE & Entertainment Weekly Red Carpet Live, streaming now on PeopleTV. Go to People.com/peopletv, or download the app on your favorite streaming device.

FROM COINAGE: The Emmy Awards by the Numbers

Other big awards to watch include outstanding limited series (which pits Big Little Lies, The Night Of, Feud: Bette and Joan, Genius and Fargo against one another) and the major acting categories like outstanding lead actress in a limited series or TV movie and lead actor in a drama series.

The 69th Primetime Emmy Awards, hosted by Stephen Colbert, are airing live on CBS from the Microsoft Theater in Los Angeles.

Angelina Jolie looks elegant in a flowing silk dress

She’s been doing the rounds promoting her new film First They Killed My Father.

And Angelina Jolie was once again dressed to impress when she arrived at the Q&A for the upcoming documentary in Los Angeles on Saturday, looking elegant as ever.

The Hollywood veteran stunned in a cream silk ensemble, making a glamorous arrival at the event.

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Glamorous: Angelina Jolie was once again dressed to impress when she arrived at the Q&A for the upcoming documentary in Los Angeles on Saturday, looking elegant as ever

Glamorous: Angelina Jolie was once again dressed to impress when she arrived at the Q&A for the upcoming documentary in Los Angeles on Saturday, looking elegant as ever

Glamorous: Angelina Jolie was once again dressed to impress when she arrived at the Q&A for the upcoming documentary in Los Angeles on Saturday, looking elegant as ever

Angelina sported a loose white dress with a matching duster jacket featuring subtle fringing on the hemline.

The brunette beauty carried a smart designer handbag, coordinating her arm candy with her nude stilettos.

She flashed a big grin as she was met with a swarm of fans at the event, highlighting her pout with red lipstick. 

In high spirits: She flashed a big grin as she was met with a swarm of fans at the event, highlighting her pout with red lipstick

In high spirits: She flashed a big grin as she was met with a swarm of fans at the event, highlighting her pout with red lipstick

In high spirits: She flashed a big grin as she was met with a swarm of fans at the event, highlighting her pout with red lipstick

Super chic: Angelina sported a loose white dress with a matching duster jacket featuring subtle fringing on the hemline

Super chic: Angelina sported a loose white dress with a matching duster jacket featuring subtle fringing on the hemline

Super chic: Angelina sported a loose white dress with a matching duster jacket featuring subtle fringing on the hemline

This comes after Angelina was joined by her father Jon Voight at the NYC premiere for her new film on Thursday night.

They were estranged for more than six and a half years, but have made amends. 

The 42-year-old Tomb Raider star was typically striking in a strapless grey grown, which displayed her sprawling back tattoo, as she posed on the carpet in the Big Apple – alongside her father, 78.  

Stunning: Last week, Angelina was typically striking in a strapless grown, which displayed her back tattoo, as she posed at the premiere of her new film in NYC

Stunning: Last week, Angelina was typically striking in a strapless grown, which displayed her back tattoo, as she posed at the premiere of her new film in NYC

Stunning: Last week, Angelina was typically striking in a strapless grown, which displayed her back tattoo, as she posed at the premiere of her new film in NYC

The stunning grey dress first cinched in at her famously slender waist, before falling into soft pleats all the way to the floor.

Pulling into a strapless design to leave the back open, the dress drew attention to her famously sprawling back tattoo, as well as a smaller inking on her arm, as she posed effortlessly for cameras.   

She pulled her brunette locks into a loose half-up do, and elegantly tied her look together with glittering diamond earrings and matching necklace.

Classic: The stunning grey dress first cinched in at her famously slender waist, before falling into soft pleats all the way to the floor

Classic: The stunning grey dress first cinched in at her famously slender waist, before falling into soft pleats all the way to the floor

Classic: The stunning grey dress first cinched in at her famously slender waist, before falling into soft pleats all the way to the floor

Peek-a-boo: Pulling into a strapless design to leave the back open, the dress drew attention to her famously sprawling back tattoo, as well as a smaller inking on her arm

Peek-a-boo: Pulling into a strapless design to leave the back open, the dress drew attention to her famously sprawling back tattoo, as well as a smaller inking on her arm

Peek-a-boo: Pulling into a strapless design to leave the back open, the dress drew attention to her famously sprawling back tattoo, as well as a smaller inking on her arm

Elegant: She pulled her brunette locks into a loose half-up do, and accessorised with a glittering diamond necklace 

Elegant: She pulled her brunette locks into a loose half-up do, and accessorised with a glittering diamond necklace 

Elegant: She pulled her brunette locks into a loose half-up do, and accessorised with a glittering diamond necklace 

Of course the Oscar-winner’s make-up was perfectly applied, and accentuated her naturally striking features with a smokey eye and bright crimson lipstick.

Promoting a film she both directed and co-wrote, Angelina was also supported by her father Jon at the event – who lookeddapper in a classic midnight blue suit.

Keeping co-ordinated, he layered a light blue shirt and carbon crosshatch tie underneath, but casually finished his look with matching navy trainers.   

Proving the event to be a family affair however, Angelina also brought all six of her children to the event. 

Pals: Father Jon, 78, looked dapper in a classic midnight blue suit which he paired with a lighter blue shirt and carbon crosshatch tie (seen here with musician Chip Taylor

Pals: Father Jon, 78, looked dapper in a classic midnight blue suit which he paired with a lighter blue shirt and carbon crosshatch tie (seen here with musician Chip Taylor

Pals: Father Jon, 78, looked dapper in a classic midnight blue suit which he paired with a lighter blue shirt and carbon crosshatch tie (seen here with musician Chip Taylor

Kicks: Navy blue trainers with white soles rounded out his ensemble 

Kicks: Navy blue trainers with white soles rounded out his ensemble 

Kicks: Navy blue trainers with white soles rounded out his ensemble 

While Angelina obviously turned heads thanks to her grey backless gown, she made sure to get several photos with her two eldest children, Maddox, 16 and Pax, 13, as they also worked on the movie.

Maddox, who was actually born in Cambodia, was invited by his mother to participate as an executive producer, and shined on the red carpet in a black suit paired with a simple white t-shirt.

Pax served as the set photographer, and looked equally dapper in a black on black ensemble.

Inclusive: Angelina Jolie, 42, brought all of her children to the New York City premiere of her new film First They Killed My Father (also pictured with cast and producers)

Inclusive: Angelina Jolie, 42, brought all of her children to the New York City premiere of her new film First They Killed My Father (also pictured with cast and producers)

Inclusive: Angelina Jolie, 42, brought all of her children to the New York City premiere of her new film First They Killed My Father (also pictured with cast and producers)

Elegant: Angelina obviously turned heads thanks to her grey backless gown

Elegant: Angelina obviously turned heads thanks to her grey backless gown

Elegant: Angelina obviously turned heads thanks to her grey backless gown

Collaborative: The Maleficent star not only directed the drama, but also co-wrote the informative film with writer Loung Ung

Collaborative: The Maleficent star not only directed the drama, but also co-wrote the informative film with writer Loung Ung

Collaborative: The Maleficent star not only directed the drama, but also co-wrote the informative film with writer Loung Ung

Proud mom: She made sure to get several photos with her two eldest children, Maddox, 16,(left) and Pax, 13, as they also worked on the movie

Proud mom: She made sure to get several photos with her two eldest children, Maddox, 16,(left) and Pax, 13, as they also worked on the movie

Proud mom: She made sure to get several photos with her two eldest children, Maddox, 16,(left) and Pax, 13, as they also worked on the movie

Meanwhile Zahara, 12, looked to be enjoying herself in a black lace top and black trouser combination, while Shiloh, 11, opted for a grey suit minus a tie.

Finally, twins Knox and Vivienne, aged nine, also looked to be having fun, with Knox donning a classic black suit and his sister choosing a black vest and trouser look.

All of the children also wore a yellow flower somewhere on their person, while their mother placed hers in her hair.

While the exact meaning of the flowers is not known, E! News reports them as plumerias, which are thought to symbolise positivity and are worn at special occasions. 

Glam: Zahara, 12, looked to be enjoying herself in a black lace top and black trouser combination

Glam: Zahara, 12, looked to be enjoying herself in a black lace top and black trouser combination

Glam: Zahara, 12, looked to be enjoying herself in a black lace top and black trouser combination

Just like Brad? Knox donned a classic black suit sans tie for the event

Just like Brad? Knox donned a classic black suit sans tie for the event

Just like Brad? Knox donned a classic black suit sans tie for the event

All the kids wore the same yellow flower that their mom had in her hair

All the kids wore the same yellow flower that their mom had in her hair

All the kids wore the same yellow flower that their mom had in her hair

 Simple: Vivienne opted for a black vest and trouser look

 Simple: Vivienne opted for a black vest and trouser look

 Simple: Vivienne opted for a black vest and trouser look

The premiere of the Netflix film comes after Angelina met with United Nations Secretary General António Guterres at the Manhattan headquarters on Thursday.

The Special Envoy for the UN High Commissioner for Refugees easily defied her 41 years in a white silk blouse, brown pencil skirt, and nude pumps selected by stylist Jen Rade.

Rather than taking vacuous selfies or developing clothing lines, Angelina has made over 60 trips to the field as part of her work with the do-gooding intergovernmental organization. 

VIPs: The premiere of the Netflix film comes after Angelina met with United Nations Secretary General António Guterres at the Manhattan headquarters on Thursday

VIPs: The premiere of the Netflix film comes after Angelina met with United Nations Secretary General António Guterres at the Manhattan headquarters on Thursday

VIPs: The premiere of the Netflix film comes after Angelina met with United Nations Secretary General António Guterres at the Manhattan headquarters on Thursday