Quentin Tarantino Has Finished His Next Script, But Who Will Produce It?

Considering he’s only made eight proper movies in the last two decades, a film from Quentin Tarantino is always a big event in the industry. Typically, news that Tarantino has finished a new script means that the film is getting very close to beginning production. But this time, with the script for his new movie—a drama set in the late ’60s—finally completed, the director finds himself in a weird position. After making every movie in his career for Miramax and The Weinstein Company, Tarantino has no home for his ninth movie.

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Tarantino has decided to part ways with his longtime friend and collaborator after a number of allegations of sexual assault have left the once-powerful Harvey Weinstein in disgrace. Tarantino said he was appalled by the allegations, but admitted he was complicit to Weinstein’s behavior. “I knew enough to do more than I did,” Tarantino told The New York Times. “There was more to it than just the normal rumors, the normal gossip. It wasn’t secondhand. I knew he did a couple of these things.”

With The Weinstein Company in shambles, Tarantino is currently searching for a new place to make his movie. As Deadline reports, the script is currently being shopped to every major studio except for Disney (which should be obvious to anyone who’s seen a Tarantino movie):

The aspirants for Tarantino’s next film are limited to the major studios, because Tarantino and his WME reps wanted to make one deal with a studio that has the ability to release the picture globally. There has been a lot of press that the script focuses on Charles Manson and the murder spree he orchestrated, but I’m told that is akin to calling Inglourious Basterds a movie about Adolf Hitler, when the Nazi leader was only in a scene or two. Deadline reported months ago that Margot Robbie had been asked to play Manson murder victim Sharon Tate, and Tarantino has roles for—and has had conversations with—the likes of Brad Pitt, Leonardo DiCaprio, and Samuel L. Jackson, who’ve all starred in his movies before. But no casting commitments have been made so far.

Tarantino is expected to find a deal within the next two weeks.

America’s alt-sweetheart Greta Gerwig talks to cinema legend Francis Ford Coppola

COPPOLA: You did a good job, because I still think about so many of the smaller parts in your film. I loved Tracy Letts’s character, the father. Even though it was only one small part of the meal, you knew the whole meal was there.

GERWIG: In a way, I was influenced by the British director Mike Leigh. He often has characters who come in for a very brief amount of time and you don’t know completely what’s going on with them, but you get a sense of a whole human there.

COPPOLA: Well, Mike Leigh will rehearse for eight months.

GERWIG: I know. [laughs] I wish I could rehearse for eight months.

COPPOLA: What was it like making the transition from your early films—when you were practically in college—to these more established ones?

GERWIG: I wanted to be a playwright in college. That’s what I was interested in and that’s what I was moving toward, and then I had the very lucky accident of falling in love with film. Like we were saying, it wasn’t until I was 19 or 20 that I realized films are made by people, and I had the good luck of suddenly meeting them. Shooting digitally became cheaper and better. Editing became something you could do at home. You couldn’t make something that looked like a Hollywood film, but you could make something through which you could work out ideas. I was acting, but I was also conceiving the plots and operating the camera when I wasn’t onscreen or holding the boom and sitting there at night looking at how it would be edited together. In a way, I got very unvain about film acting, and it became a sort of graduate school for me. At the same time, I was busy getting rejected from every real graduate school I wanted to go to for playwriting. [laughs] Before you start a film, do you begin with an image or an idea or words?

COPPOLA: It’s usually a hunch—something that I know or feel, but that if I were pressed, I wouldn’t be able to exactly explain. When I go to sleep at night, even if I’m not thinking about it, it’s being worked on. So the next time I take the hunch out and look at it, it’s a little further along and sometimes far enough along that I can write a paragraph about it, and then two. It’s sort of like a developing embryo.

GERWIG: I’ve found that if I can explain it to someone early, it’s going to be terrible. You have to give the hunch time to grow in the dark, because otherwise—let’s say you pitch it to a friend really early—it dies.

COPPOLA: It’s like quantum physics.

GERWIG: The same applies to shooting—I didn’t have any playback on my set. I hate when people need to watch playbacks immediately after watching the performance the actors just gave seconds before.

Quentin Tarantino Has Finished the Script for His Ninth Movie


In the wake of the Harvey Weinstein sexual harassment scandal, Tarantino will be making his first film without the support of Miramax or The Weinstein Company.

Quentin Tarantino

John Salangsang/Variety/REX/Shutterstock

Quentin Tarantino is moving forward with his ninth feature film, which will mark the first time the director does not work with his longtime collaborator Harvey Weinstein. Deadline reports Tarantino has finished the script for the movie and is now shopping it around to several studios. The director previously worked with Miramax or The Weinstein Company on all of his feature films, but he’s breaking from the company after over 90 sexual harassment and assault allegations have been made against co-founder Harvey Weinstein.

Read More:Quentin Tarantino Wants Brad Pitt and Jennifer Lawrence For New Movie, And They Shouldn’t Resist

Details on Tarantino’s new movie, which is currently being referred to as “#9,” first broke over the summer when it was revealed he was putting together a script based on the Manson Family murders. Deadline reports that the script hews closely to “Pulp Fiction.” One of the stories is expected to focus on Sharon Tate, a role that has been reportedly offered to Margot Robbie.

Early rumors also suggested Tarantino made offers to Jennifer Lawrence and Brad Pitt. The latter starred in Tarantino’s 2009 film “Inglourious Basterds.” Sources have told Deadline that Tarantino also wrote characters with Samuel L. Jackson and Leonardo DiCaprio in mind. Both gentleman have worked with the director in the past. No casting decisions have been confirmed yet.

Tarantino reportedly spent the back half of the summer writing the screenplay and it now appears to be finished and ready to bring to studios. The budget required for “#9” is allegedly near the $100 million mark, which puts it in “Django Unchained” territory. The only studio not in contention for the film is Disney, since Tarantino’s hard R-rated subject matter wouldn’t be a fit. The director is hoping to start production on the movie over the summer in 2018 for a targeted 2019 release.

The filmmaker made headlines last month in the wake of the Weinstein scandal by admitting to The New York Times that he knew about some of the allegations made against the former studio head. “I knew enough to do more than I did,” Tarantino said, later explaining that he was aware of the accusations made by Rose McGowan and his former girlfriend Mira Sorvino.

Tarantino is expecting to lock in a studio to finance, market, and distribute “#9” within the next two weeks.

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Quentin Tarantino Seeking New Movie Home: Studios Reading #9 This Week

EXCLUSIVE: After making every movie in his directing career for Miramax and The Weinstein Company, Quentin Tarantino has made the hard decision to look for a new home for his upcoming film. The pic is being referred to as #9 because it is the ninth picture in his directing oeuvre, and it is being read this week by all of the major studios except Disney.

Tarantino planned to make this film — a drama set in late ’60s-early ’70s Los Angeles — with TWC, but those plans imploded with the scandalous removal of Harvey Weinstein after the revelation of a litany of nightmarish stories about forced sexual encounters with dozens of actresses and women who worked for the company. So The House That Quentin Built — as Weinstein often called his company because of the out-sized success of Tarantino-directed pictures that included Pulp Fiction, Inglourious Basterds and Django Unchained — is in the process of being sold off, and despite Tarantino’s loyalty to the 170 or so staff there that helped make his movies successful, he has officially left the building.

Margot Robbie Sharon Tate

REX/Shutterstock

The aspirants for Tarantino’s next film are limited to the major studios, because Tarantino and his WME reps wanted to make one deal with a studio that has the ability to release the picture globally. There has been a lot of press that the script focuses on Charles Manson and the murder spree he orchestrated, but I’m told that is akin to calling Inglourious Basterds a movie about Adolf Hitler, when the Nazi leader was only in a scene or two. Deadline reported months ago that Margot Robbie had been asked to play Manson murder victim Sharon Tate, and Tarantino has roles for — and has had conversations with — the likes of Brad Pitt, Leonardo DiCaprio and Samuel L. Jackson, who’ve all starred in his movies before. But no casting commitments have been made so far.

The first order of business is to secure the studio that will finance, market and distribute a movie that will begin production in mid-2018 for a 2019 release. All of the majors are in except for Disney, which doesn’t make the R-rated milieu that Tarantino has always worked in. I’m told that the script has strong commercial appeal, and if there is a film of Tarantino’s it can be best compared to, it would be Pulp Fiction, which also was set in Los Angeles about a decade after this one. The film will carry a budget in the range of Django Unchained, and it is expected that the hard conversations will begin early next week, with a deal culminating within the next two weeks.

Q&A: Pam Grier on ‘Jackie Brown,’ Quentin Tarantino, Florence Henderson | Movies

Pam Grier came to fame as star of a series of so-called “blaxploitation” films in the 1970s, including “Coffy,” “Foxy Brown” and “Friday Foster.” Those flicks did not go unnoticed by director and film buff Quentin Tarantino, who had Grier in mind when he adapted Elmore Leonard’s novel “Rum Punch” for the big screen as “Jackie Brown” (1997). The title role earned her a Golden Globe nomination for best actress.

Grier will accept the “Women in Film” award from Cinema St. Louis when she appears at a screening of “Jackie Brown” on Friday evening as part of the St. Louis International Film Festival, which runs from Thursday through Nov. 12. She also stars (alongside the late Florence Henderson) in the festival opener, “Bad Grandmas.”

Recently, Grier spoke with Go! Magazine about her career.

• “Jackie Brown” brought you to the attention of a new audience. What was that experience like? Tarantino had loved my work and loved the fact that I had done almost five years of theater. If I hadn’t had that level of preparation, he may not have written “Jackie Brown” for me. But he knew that I was dedicating my time just to do theater, just to grasp what theater is.

• The film has a terrific cast: Samuel L. Jackson, Michael Keaton, even Robert De Niro in a supporting role. De Niro is brilliant playing a character who’s a few seconds slow. That’s difficult to do. Many times I had to turn away so I wouldn’t start laughing. And all of us together? At lunchtime, it was insanity.

• What do you think of Tarantino’s assessment that you were the first female action star? He’s probably right.

• Of the “blaxploitation” films that you starred in, do you have a favorite? They’re all different, so they’re all my favorites. When I look at those films, each and every one is unique and original. I don’t like being redundant.


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Bad Grandmas

From left: Pam Grier, Florence Henderson, Sally Eaton and Susie Wall in “Bad Grandmas.” Handout

• In “Bad Grandmas,” you co-star with Florence Henderson, who is remembered as the mom on “The Brady Bunch.” Had you worked with her before? On a Hallmark movie called “Ladies of the House.” We just had a great time. To have the Brady mama and Foxy Brown together? We were good to go.

What “Jackie Brown” with Pam Grier • When 8 p.m. Friday • Where Tivoli Theatre, 6350 Delmar Boulevard • How much $15 • More info cinemastlouis.org