Dominic Lacasse – Homme-Drapeau



Âgé de trente-neuf ans, Dominic a débuté sa carrière d’acrobate actuelle après 7 ans de gymnastique et 14 ans de pratique des arts du cirque. Choisi pour représenter le drapeau de son propre pays lors des célébrations officielles du 400e anniversaire de la Ville de Québec, Dominic a développé et perfectionné l’art du drapeau humain qu’il a amené à un niveau plus élevé et transformé en une discipline artistique.

Pour celui que l’on connaît sous le nom de ”l’homme drapeau”, la demande n’a cessé d’augmenter depuis et il voyage partout dans le monde pour démontrer ce numéro impressionnant. Dominic a effectué d’innombrables prestations en direct et il a participé à des émissions télévisées d’envergure, dont The Ellen Degeneres Show, Le plus grand cabaret du monde et La France a un incroyable talent, entre autres.

En novembre 2007, Dominic est apparu dans les Records du monde GuinnessMC alors qu’il a établi le record du plus long drapeau humain, en maintenant la position pendant un impressionnant 39 secondes.

Il a également reçu plusieurs prix de festivals de cirque, dont le Prix spécial à Monte-Carlo en 2009, la médaille d’argent à Wuqiao (Chine) en 2009 et la médaille de bronze à Izhevsk (Russie) en 2010.

Un entraîneur très en demande en trampoline, arts de cirque, gymnastique, conditionnement physique et flexibilité, Dominic entraîne quelques-uns des artistes de cirque les plus performants au monde. Dominic est un spécialiste des acrobaties, tant terrestres qu’aériennes. Il a dû laisser sa profession de côté pour répondre à la demande toujours grandissante de son numéro unique.

Pour information et réservation, contactez-nous:

Productions Hugues Pomerleau inc.
Agences d’artistes et de spectacles
www.huguespomerleau.com

(514) 954-9300 Montréal
(418) 686-5162 Québec
(819) 560-7384 Sherbrooke
(416) 934-8610 Toronto
(819) 779-2055 Gatineau
(819) 470-6908 Drummondville
(450) 361-0232 Granby
(819) 862-0053 Trois-Rivières
(450) 223-2410 St-Hyacinthe
(418) 591-1905 Chicoutimi
(418) 220-9905 St-Georges-de-Beauce
(418) 868-7901 Rivières-du-Loup
(418) 734-9908 Rimouski
FAX : (418) 903-9130

Courriel : info@huguespomerleau.com

Jodie Foster Really Bugs Me

Do not get me wrong: I am very admiring of her as an actress, as a director and as a strong woman in a male-dominated industry who continues to navigate what can only be described as an individualistic, trends-bucking career.

And she does not look half bad in a soft close-up, either. But that's another thought entirely.
My gripe with Jodie is her insistence on living a closeed life when, as an intelligent, thoughtful woman who sees to understand prejudice and intolerance, she should have appreciation for the value of lesbian visibility.

The Jodie Question is no longer whether or not she is a lesbian. Rather, it is Why Will not She Come Out.
In the past, Hollywood lesbians who have toyed indecisively with the closet door have done so in large part because they have had to exceed very real fears about how coming out would impact their careers.
Think Portia de Rossi, who by her own admission stayed in the closet for a long time because she knew her career would suffer if and when she came out.

Think Ellen DeGeneres, who practically kicked the closet door down, only to find that her career did indeed suffer so dramatically that she proably should have tried tip-toe out instead.
But think also Melissa Etheridge, whose grand announcement was met with, well, indifference. Not because women the world over did not care, but because they knew anyway, and because her career was so well established, largely due to her gay appeal, that it made no difference one way or the other.

Rather than Portia or Ellen, Jodie falls in the Melissa category.
Ask yourself: what would a candid Yes I am interview in The Advocate do for her career?

Answer: Probably not much.

It's not as if her romantic lead roles will suddenly dry up – when last did you see Jodie in a hetro snog? Maverick, of course, does not count, for the simple reason that everyone concerned looked so ill at ease as to render the whole film decidedly a-sexual.
Ditto Contact, where the sole sex scene was nothing more than a superfluous nod to an odd improbability in the original script.
Jodie has gone man-less in her more memorable, and, particularly, most commercially successful movies: Silence of the Lambs, Panic Room, Flight Plan.

It is safe also to say that Jodie probably is not going to be doing slushy romcoms or romatic dramas in the near future: she simply is not going to read for the Jessica Simpson / Kirsten Dunst roles, nor is any dollar-minded director going to be casting her in those roles.
So what is the big deal?

Jodie is fiercely private, and obviously has great concern for inviting a media frenzy that could impact on her sons.
Fair enough. But by not coming out, what is she teaching her children about honesty and integrity and being true to yourself, not to mention the responsibility of a life lived in public. For as much as Jodie insists on a private life, her livelihood has come from her accessibility on the screen; her invitation to people to bring her into their lives and even into their homes.

She is a role model already, whether she likes it or not. But that kind of role model?

By refusing to acknowledge the truths of her life, she is turning her back on a power that few people have: the power to break stereotypes, the power to promote tolerance of diversity, and, perhaps most importantly, the power to honor honesty and truth .