Kerry James Marshall Has Created a Mural for Chicago Featuring Oprah Winfrey, Susanne Ghez, and More

A rendering of the new mural.

DEPARTMENT OF CULTURAL AFFAIRS AND SPECIAL EVENTS

The people of Chicago are getting a giant mural from none other than the great Kerry James Marshall, and it looks to be a good one.

The work in question, which is being installed on the Chicago Cultural Center starting today, is, at least based on renderings, a characteristically winning outdoor scene from Marshall, with a radiant sun, cardinals aflutter as they hold a ribbon, and portraits of 20 women who have been involved in culture in the city over the years. Those women include Oprah Winfrey; Susanne Ghez, the pioneering director of the Renaissance Society; and Barbara Gaines, the founder of artistic director of the Chicago Shakespeare Theater.

The mural will be huge—measuring 132 by 100 feet, which makes it even larger than the large mural that Marshall temporarily installed along the High Line in New York two years back.

The word RUSHMORE appears prominently on a branch of a tree in the work. “When I was asked to design a mural for narrow Garland Court, it was immediately clear to me that the site had to be ‘opened up’ in some way,” Marshall said in a statement, referring to the modestly sized street that runs along one side of the cultural center. “My solution was a park-like view with a bright sun and stand of trees to bring light and green space to the location while at the same time honoring the mission of the building as the hub of artistic activity in Chicago. My idea was to make of the trees a kind of Forest Rushmore acknowledging the contribution of 20 women who’ve worked to shape the cultural landscape of the city, past and present.”

Work on the mural will continue for the next month as part of the city’s Public Art Festival, which occurs during its Year of Public Art.

Mayor Rahm Emanuel sounds pretty pumped about the project. He told the Chicago Tribune, “My goal for the Year of Public Art was to bring the most prominent artist in the world to Chicago and give the city a gift for generations to come, with the Cultural Center serving as its campus.”

The full list of portraits included in the mural follows below, with job titles provided by the city:

Susanne Ghez, Director and Chief Curator for nearly 40 years, The Renaissance Society

Barbara Gaines, Founder and Artistic Director, Chicago Shakespeare Theater

Jacqueline Russell, Founder and Artistic Director, Chicago Children’s Theatre

Ruth Page, Dancer, Choreographer and Founder, Ruth Page Center for the Arts

Lois Weisberg, Longest-serving Commissioner of the Chicago Department of Cultural Affairs

Maggie Daley, Longest-serving First Lady of the City of Chicago

Jackie Taylor, Founder and CEO, Black Ensemble Theater

Monica Haslip, Founder and Executive Director, Little Black Pearl

Abena Joan Brown, Founder, ETA Creative Arts Foundation

Margaret Burroughs, Founder, DuSable Museum of African American History

Harriet Monroe, Founder, Poetry Magazine

Cheryl Lynn Bruce, Co-founder, Goodman Theatre / Dearborn Homes Youth Drama Workshop

Sandra Delgado, Founding Ensemble Member, Collaboraction

Jane Saks, Founding Director of the Ellen Stone Belic Institute and Project&

Barbara Jones-Hogu, Founding Member, AfriCobra

Gwendolyn Brooks, Literary Icon

Sandra Cisneros, Literary Icon

Achy Obejas, Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist

Oprah Winfrey, Cultural Icon

Joan Gray, Dancer and Longtime President of Muntu Dance Theatre of Chicago

Oprah Winfrey news: TV personality prepares for debut in ’60 Minutes’

Actress Oprah Winfrey from the film “The Butler” arrives at the 20th annual Screen Actors Guild Awards in Los Angeles, California January 18, 2014.REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson

America’s big television personality, Oprah Winfrey, is going to be making her debut as part of the “60 Minutes” team on CBS on Sept. 24. Just recently, she has been reported to be busy making preparations to start as she gets her basic requirements and attending board meetings.

Oprah shared a picture on Instagram, posing along the steps beside the CBS building’s logo, as she points to her new employee’s identification card. She stated that “It’s official. Got my CBS id card today. First story on the air this Sunday.#60minutes.” She will be the new special correspondent of “60 Minutes,” and her previous stories on social media gave fans a sneak peek of what a behind-the-scenes work is like in Oprah’s day.

According to Entertainment Tonight, Oprah expressed her excitement in working for “60 Minutes,” stating that she has always been an avid admirer of the show and that she is glad to be part of such a long-running and trusted news program. She describes the show as a “bastion of journalistic storytelling,” which is something that Oprah has always been inclined to. Oprah has always been fascinated with people’s individual stories.

The Hollywood Reporter is more curious about Oprah’s ability to bring people together and help them be brought to a realm of profound understanding and compromise. For her first story on “60 Minutes,” Oprah could be tackling the issue of America’s political division. However, the 63-year-old is not known to be a regular participant of political discussions, compared to contemporary correspondents that are always up to speed when it comes to politics.

No matter what happens, Oprah could still be a big draw and a win for the network since she has a very large fan base. According to Deadline, Oprah’s debut in the show is just fitting which is in time for the 50th anniversary celebration. This means that the episode on Sunday will be a very special one and it might even boost the already formidable ratings of the show.

“60 Minutes” will air every Sunday at 7:30 p.m. EDT on CBS.

Kerry James Marshall Has Created a Mural for Chicago Featuring Oprah Winfrey, Suzanne Ghez, and More

A rendering of the new mural.

DEPARTMENT OF CULTURAL AFFAIRS AND SPECIAL EVENTS

The people of Chicago are getting a giant mural from none other than the great Kerry James Marshall, and it looks to be a good one.

The work in question, which is being installed on the Chicago Cultural Center starting today, is, at least based on renderings, a characteristically winning outdoor scene from Marshall, with a radiant sun, cardinals aflutter as they hold a ribbon, and portraits of 20 women who have been involved in culture in the city over the years. Those women include Oprah Winfrey; Suzanne Ghez, the pioneering director of the Renaissance Society; and Barbara Gaines, the founder of artistic director of the Chicago Shakespeare Theater.

The mural will be huge—measuring 132 by 100 feet, which makes it even larger than the large mural that Marshall temporarily installed along the High Line in New York two years back.

The word RUSHMORE appears prominently on a branch of a tree in the work. “When I was asked to design a mural for narrow Garland Court, it was immediately clear to me that the site had to be ‘opened up’ in some way,” Marshall said in a statement, referring to the modestly sized street that runs along one side of the cultural center. “My solution was a park-like view with a bright sun and stand of trees to bring light and green space to the location while at the same time honoring the mission of the building as the hub of artistic activity in Chicago. My idea was to make of the trees a kind of Forest Rushmore acknowledging the contribution of 20 women who’ve worked to shape the cultural landscape of the city, past and present.”

Work on the mural will continue for the next month as part of the city’s Public Art Festival, which occurs during its Year of Public Art.

Mayor Rahm Emanuel sounds pretty pumped about the project. He told the Chicago Tribune, “My goal for the Year of Public Art was to bring the most prominent artist in the world to Chicago and give the city a gift for generations to come, with the Cultural Center serving as its campus.”

The full list of portraits included in the mural follows below, with job titles provided by the city:

Suzanne Ghez, Director and Chief Curator for nearly 40 years, The Renaissance Society

Barbara Gaines, Founder and Artistic Director, Chicago Shakespeare Theater

Jacqueline Russell, Founder and Artistic Director, Chicago Children’s Theatre

Ruth Page, Dancer, Choreographer and Founder, Ruth Page Center for the Arts

Lois Weisberg, Longest-serving Commissioner of the Chicago Department of Cultural Affairs

Maggie Daley, Longest-serving First Lady of the City of Chicago

Jackie Taylor, Founder and CEO, Black Ensemble Theater

Monica Haslip, Founder and Executive Director, Little Black Pearl

Abena Joan Brown, Founder, ETA Creative Arts Foundation

Margaret Burroughs, Founder, DuSable Museum of African American History

Harriet Monroe, Founder, Poetry Magazine

Cheryl Lynn Bruce, Co-founder, Goodman Theatre / Dearborn Homes Youth Drama Workshop

Sandra Delgado, Founding Ensemble Member, Collaboraction

Jane Saks, Founding Director of the Ellen Stone Belic Institute and Project&

Barbara Jones-Hogu, Founding Member, AfriCobra

Gwendolyn Brooks, Literary Icon

Sandra Cisneros, Literary Icon

Achy Obejas, Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist

Oprah Winfrey, Cultural Icon

Joan Gray, Dancer and Longtime President of Muntu Dance Theatre of Chicago

First Look: “Justice” | Tyler Perry’s If Loving You Is Wrong | Oprah Winfrey Network



Kelly finds herself in legal troubles that threaten her freedom. Also, Randal continues to antagonize Brad and Marcie. For more on #iflovingyouiswrong, visit

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About Tyler Perry’s If Loving You is Wrong:
From prolific writer, director, producer Tyler Perry, “If Loving You is Wrong” is a sexy, sleek drama that takes viewers into the lives of a group of husbands, wives and friends that live and love in the same middle class neighborhood. On the surface they are true-to-life, relatable people – raising children, working jobs, finding and maintaining romance – but just below the veneer of happiness, their lives are entangled by heartbreak, deceit and lies that threaten to destroy everything.

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First Look: “Justice” | Tyler Perry’s If Loving You Is Wrong | Oprah Winfrey Network

‘60 Minutes’ showrunner Jeff Fager on Oprah Winfrey, show’s future and more

The 50th season of “60 Minutes” launches Sunday (CBS/2, 7:30 p.m.) with a little birthday surprise: Oprah Winfrey, who joins the iconic magazine as “special contributor.” I spoke recently with the show’s longtime showrunner, Jeff Fager, about this new face and a few other topics, notably the show’s future and its glorious — sometimes contentious — past. Fager, who joined the show in 1989 as the producer for correspondent Steve Kroft, has written a book, “Fifty Years of 60 Minutes: The Inside Story of Television’s Most Influential News Broadcast,” which will be published Oct. 24.

Oprah’s certainly a major departure for “60.” What will she bring to the show?

Our sensibilities are so similar and she wants to cover stories with impact. That’s why this fits so well. Her first story is about the divide in America — a panel discussion — and she’s just so good at bringing things out of people, which is what our correspondents do.

She is beloved by millions, but she’s also a politicized personality — an important backer of both President Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton’s candidacy. Any concern that viewers will see her that way?

She and we will be judged based on the work she does here. I’m not concerned about that one bit. You can’t see that she’s coming from any particular place and we’re going to be proud of the work she does here. In terms of background and history, she reminds me a little bit of Mike Wallace, who had a full career before starting at “60,” but the one thing he did that stands out as with her was the interview and that ability to absorb.

 

How many pieces a year will she do?

At first I thought four or five, but she’s motivated and it could be more. She sees that at this particular moment, it’s a nice place to be and there are not many news programs who can still attract the mass audience we do.

What will “60” evolve to in the next 10 or so years — or even beyond?

We’ve always stuck to our values and standards — that hasn’t changed and won’t.

Nevertheless, the world is rapidly changing around you — almost more in the past couple of years than in the past 50. Doesn’t that present a profound challenge?

In terms of delivery of the program, that is going to change dramatically in the next 10 years. We work [play] very well on mobile devices, for example. We’re fortunate in that way.

But the “60” audience is older and accustomed to the way things have always been. You will adapt, but will they?

Our audience is actually a lot younger than the cable news audience — our viewers’ average age is around 59. But we also know that in the future, people aren’t going to be watching broadcast television the way they do now. Nevertheless, that translates well for us because we translate so well in the digital world.

That  may well be, but I’d argue that part of the magic of “60” is that Sunday 7 p.m. appointment habit. Will that be irrevocably lost in the all-digital future?

 We are still an appointment for 90 percent of the people who watch, [but] crystal-balling 10 years from now, it’s hard to imagine where we will be delivered. If in a digital format, that’s not a bad way to watch and in fact a good way.

Let’s talk quickly about the extraordinary history of this show. The high points are many, but as you write in the book, the lowest was around the 25th anniversary so-called “Tobaccogate,” when CBS lawyers forced the show to spike a story about a tobacco industry whistleblower. How bad was that moment?

 

It was our worst moment, and it’s very difficult looking back and thinking what could we have done differently. It was also probably the best story that ever came into “60 Minutes” and the company said we couldn’t air it. .. . If Don [Hewitt, legendary “60” founder, who died in 2009] had resigned, it might have been the end of the program.

The “60” spinoff — “60 Minutes II,” which launched in ’99 and wrapped in 2005 — was another interesting part of the history, and yielded ’gate: Memogate a discredited story about President George W. Bush’s service in the Air National Guard, based on a memo that appeared to have been forged. Was “60 II” a mistake in hindsight?

  Absolutely not a mistake. It was an amazing place where great stories were being broadcast for five, six years.

Nevertheless, Memogate did come out of the show, and effectively ended Dan Rather’s long career at CBS News. Have you both patched up your differences?

I was never at war with Dan. I love him and he was one of the greatest correspondents that ever worked at CBS and always felt that way. And if you look at the history of “60,” it took off the moment he joined [in 1975].

The death of Bob Simon [in 2015] was a huge shock, but “60” had endured other blows over the years and of course continued, even thrived. Not many other programs could manage that. How did this one?

The deaths of Bob and Ed Bradley [in 2006] were both huge shocks and nothing had prepared us for them. . . It’s always been an ensemble of reporters. Mike was first among equals and I still think of him as the ultimate “60 Minutes” correspondent. But even he didn’t want to be thought of as a star figure. He recognized that it’s the ensemble that makes us so good.

There does appear to be one irreplaceable figure: Andy Rooney [who died in 2011]. I believe you had talked to Jon Stewart about taking his place?

Yes [the discussions went on for years]. I don’t think he ever wanted to do it, but he was tempted. He had enough on his plate. I feel it’s almost impossible to replace Andy. He’s just one of those figures who fit into that world so perfectly. I never felt pressure to fill the role and never felt that it had to be filled. I miss him and love him, but I’m not going to put something on that doesn’t work for us.

Is Oprah Winfrey Finally Coming to Broadway? See Why Fans Are Speculative

Should you be buying your tickets already? Not quite yet. Theater fans started getting excited when they thought there was a chance Oprah Winfrey might be coming to Broadway after they saw the media mogul with five-time Tony Award-winner George C. Wolfe at the 2017 Emmys on Sunday, Sept. 17.

However, a source crushed our hopes and dreams when they confirmed that Oprah isn’t preparing for her Broadway debut anytime soon. “They are not working on a play together. Oprah was at the Emmys because she was an executive producer on The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks and George was the director,” the insider told Page Six.

The 63-year-old was set to appear in Night, Mother back in 2015 before she backed out, and she also works as a producer on The Color Purple. In a previous interview with The New York Times, Oprah opened up about what it would take for her to get on the stage.

“I’ve been thinking about, for the past maybe three years, coming to Broadway myself, but when I see how much work is involved, and the kind of energy it takes to do that every night, I don’t know,” she confessed. “I’m looking for the perfect material. Something will come along. If the right material comes along, then I’ll do it.”

Oprah Winfrey George C. Wolfe Getty Images

Oprah and George. (Photo Credit: Getty Images)

She continued, “The appeal would be that there would be a story so compelling and so moving that I would want to experience, share and offer that story on a nightly basis — that’s what it would take for me. A couple of times I’ve been in readings, and I’ve said: ‘Do I really want to say these words? Are these words so moving and so necessary that I feel I will come across the country and give up my dogs and relocate to go onstage every night to say these words?’ I haven’t found those words yet.”

However, if she were to do it, it’d be in a play and not a musical. “That I know for sure,” she said. “I can’t sing.” We still have our fingers crossed that Oprah will one day take the stage!

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Oprah Winfrey: Oprah Winfrey to be on Shah Rukh’s show TED Talks India: Nayi Soch?

TED Talks India: Nayi Soch is the Indian version of TED Talks which sees an interesting lineup of the A-listers in Bollywood and the sports world. It is all set to air in October and will be hosted by the Shah Rukh Khan himself. The show has seen big names like Javed Akhtar, Mithali Raj and Karan Johar in the episodes that have been shot already.

| Sep 18, 2017, 21:25 IST

TED Talks India: Nayi Soch is the Indian version of TED Talks which sees an interesting lineup of the A-listers in Bollywood and the sports world. It is all set to air in October and will be hosted by the Shah Rukh Khan himself. The show has seen big names like Javed Akhtar, Mithali Raj and Karan Johar in the episodes that have been shot already.

Word has it that International celebrity TV host, Oprah Winfrey has been approached to come on the show. Shahrukh Khan, the host of TED Talks India wants some international celebrities which will add to the celebrity quotient for the show.


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Shah Rukh Khan gets Google CEO Sundar Pichai on TED Talks India Nayi Soch

A source said, “Shahrukh met Oprah when she attended Parmeshwar Godrej’s party in India in 5 years ago. He connected with her so well that he decided to call her back to India and this time on a show that would be honoured to have such an influential person talk to the Indian audiences.”

The show has already shot seven episodes, with a remaining of three to be shot soon. Oprah started being recognized since her show, “The Oprah Winfrey Show” in 1986. She was thus, the first thought for an appearance on the show. She through her show, managed to inspire the whole of America and continues to be recognized as an influential figure around the world today.

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Oprah Winfrey Is Probably the Most-Thanked Person in Emmy History

At the 2017 Emmys, it was good to be Stephen Colbert. It was good to be Donald Glover. It was good to be Julia Louis-Dreyfus. But it was the best to be Oprah Winfrey

Was she nominated for an acting Emmy? No. Did she win for Outstanding Television Movie? She did not. But she was undoubtedly the star of the show. 

That’s because nobody could believe their luck to be in the same room as Miss Winfrey. Some people were flabbergasted to be sitting near her honor. Some people simply reveled in getting to stand onstage and be allowed to look directly at her. But whatever the reason, it seemed like every single person who won an award felt compelled to give her a shoutout. 

It all started during the monologue, when Colbert noted that Winfrey was sitting in the front row even though she was snubbed for an actor nomination. Next up was his late-night competitor John Oliver, who accepted the award for Outstanding Writing for a Variety Series. 

“I would like to thank Oprah,” he said after encouraging the audience to start tweeting about D.C. public schools. “Because she is sitting right there and it seems inappropriate not to.” 

Then came Riz Ahmed, who won a gold statue for his role on the HBO limited series The Night Of

“I am lucky enough to thank Oprah as well,” he started his speech. “I was also lucky enough to sit near her.” 

Oliver himself came back to the stage later, for another award that went to Last Week Tonight. “I would like to thank Oprah’s seat filler,” he joked. “I met Oprah once and it was like meeting the Queen only much, much better.”

Then just to make everything come full circle, Oprah was given the honor of presenting the final award of the evening. She announced The Handmaid’s Tale as the winner of Outstanding Drama Series in the most perfectly Oprah way ever (You get a statue! You get a statue! Everybody gets a statue!)

And that’s how it’s done. 

Don’t miss E! News Monday at 7 and 11 p.m. and tune in to the Fashion Police 2017 Emmys Special, with guest co-host Erika Jayne, Monday at 8 p.m., only on E!

Oprah Winfrey Joins ’60 Minutes’ With First Feature on Political Divisions

Oprah Winfrey is the newest addition to the long-running news magazine program “60 Minutes.” The show will open its 50th season this September and Winfrey’s first feature will be on political divisions.

REUTERS/Adrees LatifOprah Winfrey is officially a special contributor for “60 Minutes” on its 50th year.

Winfrey as a special contributor to “60 Minutes” first came to light in January, when CBS confirmed that it signed the popular media personality. Winfrey’s debut will be on the episode airing Sunday, Sept. 24, at 7:00 p.m. EST.

Winfrey was in Grand Rapids, Michigan in late August to film her segment. It’s been presumed that she was there to cover why the state supported President Donald Trump in the 2016 elections when Michigan voted for President Barack Obama’s two terms.

“She wants to do stories with impact,” executive producer Jeff Fager said. “She’s driven by that and so are we. That’s part of why this is such a good fit for her.”

Winfrey told Vogue how she got the idea on political divide and the “60 Minutes” job. She was hosting a roundtable discussion for O Magazine that involved women supporters of both Trump and Hillary Clinton and it happened a few weeks after the elections.

Before the discussion started, there was an apparent tension among the participants. She did not turn the conversation into a political debate and took on a different angle.

“I was able to get those women from different backgrounds to begin to actually hear and feel for each other,” Winfrey said.

Fager has been asking her to do “60 Minutes” for several years and she finally has an idea on what story to work on following her experience with the women.

Winfrey has done several iconic and impactful interviews in the past while she was still doing her daytime talk show “Oprah.” She sat down with professional cyclist Lance Armstrong when he confirmed that he took performance-enhancing drugs. Tom Cruise professed his love for Katie Holmes to Winfrey like a crazed teenager when he jumped on her couch on her show.

“60 Minutes” solidified the careers of journalists Don Hewitt, Ed Bradley, Mike Wallace and Morley Safer. Today’s current contributors include Anderson Cooper, Bill Whitaker, Charlie Rose, David Martin, Jon Wertheim, Lara Logan, Lesley Stahl, Norah O’Donnell, Sharyn Alfonsi and Scott Pelley.

On Oct. 5, “60 Minutes” will be honored by the National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences in New York for its 50th year.

Oprah Winfrey joins ‘60 Minutes’ for 50th anniversary year



NEW YORK >> CBS’ “60 Minutes,” the newsmagazine that can credit consistency for much of its success as it enters its 50th anniversary year, is about to see a major change with the addition of Oprah Winfrey.

Winfrey will debut Sept. 24, reporting on a story about America’s political divisions.

It’s a testament to the power of the Sunday-night newsmagazine that it seeks to absorb one of television’s biggest stars into its fabric instead of the other way around. One of the medium’s best-known celebrity interviewers will do some, but will largely work against type in reporting stories, said Jeff Fager, the show’s executive producer.

“She wants to do stories with impact,” he said. “She’s driven by that and so are we. That’s part of why this is such a good fit for her.”

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Many of the names that made “60 Minutes” great — Mike Wallace, Morley Safer, Ed Bradley, Don Hewitt — are gone now. But the stopwatch keeps ticking every Sunday at 7 p.m. While everything in media seems to have changed around it, the show’s mix of investigations, news-making interviews, esoteric and entertaining features timed to the length of founding executive producer Hewitt’s attention span remains remarkably unchanged.

“It’s a miracle,” correspondent Lesley Stahl said.

When she joined in 1991, Hewitt told Stahl that he wanted correspondents to be like actors in a repertory troupe who could play all the roles, and that’s still the philosophy she uses to plan stories she pursues.

Gone, too, are the volatile days of throwing coffee cups, shouting matches and feuds, of Wallace peeking at colleagues’ notebooks to steal stories. But it’s still keenly competitive. Newcomer Bill Whitaker told Fager he dreamed of screening a story that his bosses found so perfect it merited no changes. Fager leaned in and told him, “that’s not going to happen.”

There’s a different pressure from the daily deadlines of the evening news, Whitaker said. At “60 Minutes,” correspondents have time, talented producers and travel budgets. So they’d better deliver.

“Everyone is trying to find an original story, something that breaks news or helps people to understand a big story,” Fager said. “That’s what we do. New people up here realize that’s a higher bar than is set anywhere else.”

“People think it’s cutthroat,” he said. “It’s not like that, the way our image would suggest. But it’s a tough place to succeed. Part of how you’re judged is how original your reporting is, and how well you cover a big story.”

Scott Pelley, Stahl, Steve Kroft, Whitaker and Anderson Cooper make up the show’s core. Charlie Rose, Winfrey, Sharyn Alfonsi, Lara Logan, David Martin, Norah O’Donnell and Jon Wertheim are among the contributors who also do stories.

“There are a lot of people who are contributors who have other jobs, and that has changed the feel of the place,” Kroft said. “I don’t think the show has changed very much on the air.”

Fager, who just completed a book on the show to mark the anniversary, talks now about how hard it was to replace Hewitt 15 years ago. Colleagues say his status as an insider at CBS News and “60 Minutes” helped him, along with the absence of an ego-driven need to make changes for change’s sake.

His biggest push has been to make the show more on the news. Interviewing former presidential adviser Steve Bannon this past Sunday illustrates the point, and Fager pushed out excerpts of the interview for a few days in advance to make headlines and attract attention. Comments Bannon made about the James Comey firing were posted on the “60 Minutes Overtime” website, which delivers outtakes from the show’s segments, and became so newsworthy Monday that they arguably should have been used in the original piece.

The show would often ignore big breaking-news stories in the past, figuring they were told elsewhere. Fager likes to find some element that hasn’t received much attention but can help a viewer better understand the event, citing Kroft’s reporting on the financial crisis a decade ago.

“The quality of the show has not dropped off,” Kroft said. “We’ve had good seasons and bad seasons all during the 30 years I’ve been here. I think the show is more timely than it used to be.”

Producers watch the ratings, but refuse to test audience preferences with polls.

“It’s really risky to do what we do,” Fager said. “It goes against everything the professionals in news organizations believe, that you have to pander, that you have to look for stories that they’re going to want, as opposed to doing stories that are important and figuring out how to do it well.”

“60 Minutes” has made high-profile mistakes; the reliance on a bad source in Logan’s 2014 Benghazi story was a major blemish. If the show has a weakness, it is that story length can simplify some stories too much, said Tom Bettag, a longtime television news producer who now teaches at the University of Maryland.

Yet the storytelling and writing put the show far ahead of the competition. Unlike newsmagazines like “Dateline NBC” and ABC’s “20/20” that have chased after trends and lost their identity, “what ‘60 Minutes’ did was stay consistent to its brand, to its vision, year in and year out,” he said.

“60 Minutes” has a rich tradition of principals who hold on to their jobs well past retirement age. The 72-year-old Kroft, who has cut back on stories and recently signed a two-year contract, doesn’t want to be one of them. Stahl, 75, said she wants to continue as long as she can do the job. She went to Fager a few years ago and said she didn’t want to fade on television and would tell him if she could sense herself slipping.

“He looked at me and said, ‘No, you won’t. Nobody ever does that.’ And he very kindly offered to do it for me,” she said with a laugh.

Mindset of Millionaires

Millionaire Mindset and Abundance is not just about money. Abundance represents the success and happiness in all of the various areas of our lives. Financial prosperity is just one aspect of abundance. You can have unimaginable wealth, but if there is lack or suffering in other areas of your life, you may not equate having money with having peace of mind and satisfaction.

Perhaps the only area of ​​your life where you are experiencing lack is in the money sector. You may feel that the American Dream is passing you by. The only abundance you seem to be manifesting is debt, college loans, credit cards, mortgage and car payments. There never seems to be an extra dollar, left over at the end of the month. At times, you feel beaten. You wonder if you'll ever get ahead. What you might be doing is blocking the flow of money into your life by your worries about your indebtedness.

The Importance of Developing a Mindset of Millionaires:

Why It Works

Many people wonder why this works, and there are more than one explanation.

The Spiritual Explanation:

Many people believe that the Law of Attraction works by aligning God or the Universe with our wishes. We are all made of energy, and our energy operates at different frequencies. We can change our frequency of energy with positive thoughts, especially gratitude for what we already have. By using grateful, positive thoughts and feelings and by focusing on our dreams (rather than our frustrations), we can change the frequency of our energy, and the law of attraction brings positive things (things of that frequency) into our lives. What we attract depends on where and how we focus our attention, but we must believe that it is already ours, or soon will be so we can vibrate at that frequency!

The Traditionally Scientific Explanation:

If you are one who needs things to be a little easier to prove, there is also a different explanation for how the law of attraction works. By focusing on attaining a new reality, and by believing it is possible, we tend to take more risks, notice more opportunities, and open ourselves up to new possibilities. Conversely, when we do not believe that something is in the realm of possibilities for us, we tend to let opportunities pass by unnoticed. When we believe we do not deserve good things, we have in ways that sabotage our chances at happiness. By changing our self talk and feelings about life, we reverse the negative patterns in our lives and create more positive, productive and healthy ones. One good thing leads to another, and the direction of a life can shift from a downward spiral to an upward ascent.

"Surround Yourself With Only People Who Are Going To Lift You Higher" – Oprah Winfrey

How Oprah Winfrey inspired Jets left tackle Kelvin Beachum

Kelvin Beachum chronicles the important moments every day, dividing his professional and private lives into separate journals. He catalogues his hopes and dreams, lessons learned and lessons to be learned.

Nine football journals rest in his Arizona home. He flipped through one of them a couple weeks ago after making the cross-country trip with his wife and daughter. The Jets left tackle wanted to access his notes on the Buffalo Bills, his first opponent this season.

He also has five personal journals inspired by Oprah Winfrey, who started keeping a Gratitude Journal more than 20 years ago to help make her “more receptive to the goodness in your life.”

Beachum embraced the power of the written word. He followed Oprah’s lead by writing three things that he was grateful for each day. It made him appreciate the simple and pure moments in life. It grounded him.

Beachum is a naturally inquisitive 28-year-old, whose thirst for knowledge will likely never be quenched. He is thoughtful, smart and appreciative in ways that escape too many of us.

He is eternally optimistic in the face of what many believe will be a Herculean challenge for the Jets this week against the powerhouse Raiders. . . and the coming weeks against everyone else.

“Life moves so fast,” Beachum said. “I’m blessed… I want to talk about what God has done for me, where he’s brought me from, the obstacles I’ve overcome. Sometimes it can be so easy for us to forget that.”

101716117480, 21334631, OCT. 17, 2016, FILE PHOTO,

Oprah Winfrey inspired Kelvin Beachum to keep journals.

(John Salangsang/AP)

Beachum’s professional education never stops. He has always been proactive about his craft, seeking out greats of the past to better himself. Last month, he reached out to seven-time Pro Bowl tackle Lomas Brown in the run-up to the Jets’ second preseason game in Detroit. Brown and Beachum talked shop in the lobby of the Jets hotel, swapping war stories. Brown waxed poetic about Richard Dent. Beachum listened.

“I want to learn,” Beachum said about talking to former great linemen. “Learn about them. Learn about their stories. Learn about the challenges they had as a player. Learn about their success. What they did right. What they did wrong. Ask for their wisdom against the edge rushers of their time.”

“I’m just blessed to know people who know people,” Beachum added. “I know that I’m going into Year 6, but that doesn’t mean that I have to stop learning. I’m talking to guys that played a long time, went to Pro Bowls, went to Super Bowls, won Super Bowls. Those are the type of people I want to be associated with and learn from.”

Brown was the latest former player to share wisdom with Beachum, who signed a three-year, $24 million deal with the Jets in the offseason. Beachum has talked to former Jets great D’Brickashaw Ferguson, two-time Pro Bowler Brad Hopkins and many more. He trains each offseason with former Pro Bowl lineman LeCharles Bentley.

While most of the rest of the NFL world loves debating Brady vs. Montana, Beachum is consumed with discussing the big eaters of the past and present. During a break at a training camp practice, offensive line coach Steve Marshall and tight ends coach Jimmie Johnson, who played with Washington’s famed Hogs in the 1980s, got into a debate about the greatest tackle of all-time. Anthony Munoz? Walter Jones?

“It’s like the whole conversation with Michael Jordan, Kobe and now LeBron,” Beachum said before letting out a laugh. “I couldn’t care less about the quarterbacks. If you think about all the great quarterbacks, they had to have offensive linemen to protect them. I think you have a deeper appreciation for what you do and you respect it more and take more pride in it when you understand some of the history and some of the things that others went through. I want to understand some of the lessons that they learned that afforded me the opportunity that I have. I wouldn’t call myself a historian, but I loooove the history of offensive line play.”

Not Released (NR)

Kelvin Beachum is emerging as an important voice for the Jets.

(Dan Istitene/Getty Images)

Beachum transformed from a tight end to a left tackle when the starting blind-side protector on his junior high school team got hurt. He’s never looked back. He was exposed to some former greats at SMU by coach Dennis McKnight, who played with Brown in the NFL, and mentor Adrian Klemm, who won three Super Bowls with the Patriots.

Beachum might be a large human by normal standards, but at a shade under 6-3 and 298 pounds, he’s about four inches shorter and 30 pounds lighter than the prototypical left tackle. Yet the former seventh-round pick by the Steelers has lasted six years in the league.

“They say that anybody can get to the league… but how do you stay here?” Beachum said. “There’s people that got drafted the same year that I got drafted that are not here anymore. It’s about staying in the league… not just getting here. I want to play until the wheels fall off.”

He also wants to share the lessons that he’s learned with younger teammates. Second-year right tackle Brandon Shell has used Beachum as an invaluable resource, picking the veteran’s brain about footwork, hand and head placement.

“It’s just small things that can better me as a player,” Shell said. “I always talk to him about back-side blocking.”

Beachum has become an important voice amid the Jets’ culture change. They need more players and people willing to embrace what he did long ago. The pursuit of knowledge should never end. 

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Oprah Winfrey’s ’60 Minutes’ Debut to Cover Political Divide in America

Winfrey will appear on the show Sept. 24.

CBS’ 60 Minutes, the newsmagazine that can credit consistency for much of its success as it enters its 50th anniversary year, is about to see a major change with the addition of Oprah Winfrey.

Winfrey will debut Sept. 24, reporting on a story about America’s political divisions.

It’s a testament to the power of the Sunday-night newsmagazine that it seeks to absorb one of television’s biggest stars into its fabric instead of the other way around. One of the medium’s best-known celebrity interviewers will do some, but will largely work against type in reporting stories, said Jeff Fager, the show’s executive producer.

“She wants to do stories with impact,” he said. “She’s driven by that and so are we. That’s part of why this is such a good fit for her.”

Many of the names that made 60 Minutes great — Mike Wallace, Morley Safer, Ed Bradley, Don Hewitt — are gone now. But the stopwatch keeps ticking every Sunday at 7 p.m. While everything in media seems to have changed around it, the show’s mix of investigations, news-making interviews, esoteric and entertaining features timed to the length of founding executive producer Hewitt’s attention span remains remarkably unchanged.

“It’s a miracle,” said correspondent Lesley Stahl.

When she joined in 1991, Hewitt told Stahl that he wanted correspondents to be like actors in a repertory troupe who could play all the roles, and that’s still the philosophy she uses to plan stories she pursues.

Gone, too, are the volatile days of throwing coffee cups, shouting matches and feuds, of Wallace peeking at colleagues’ notebooks to steal stories. But it’s still keenly competitive. Newcomer Bill Whitaker told Fager he dreamed of screening a story that his bosses found so perfect it merited no changes. Fager leaned in and told him, “that’s not going to happen.”

There’s a different pressure from the daily deadlines of the evening news, Whitaker said. At 60 Minutes, correspondents have time, talented producers and travel budgets. So they’d better deliver.

“Everyone is trying to find an original story, something that breaks news or helps people to understand a big story,” Fager said. “That’s what we do. New people up here realize that’s a higher bar than is set anywhere else.”

“People think it’s cutthroat,” he said. “It’s not like that, the way our image would suggest. But it’s a tough place to succeed. Part of how you’re judged is how original your reporting is, and how well you cover a big story.”

Scott Pelley, Stahl, Steve Kroft, Whitaker and Anderson Cooper make up the show’s core. Charlie Rose, Winfrey, Sharyn Alfonsi, Lara Logan, David Martin, Norah O’Donnell and Jon Wertheim are among the contributors who also do stories.

“There are a lot of people who are contributors who have other jobs, and that has changed the feel of the place,” Kroft said. “I don’t think the show has changed very much on the air.”

Fager, who just completed a book on the show to mark the anniversary, talks now about how hard it was to replace Hewitt 15 years ago. Colleagues say his status as an insider at CBS News and 60 Minutes helped him, along with the absence of an ego-driven need to make changes for change’s sake.

His biggest push has been to make the show more on the news. Interviewing former presidential adviser Steve Bannon last Sunday illustrates the point, and Fager pushed out excerpts of the interview for a few days in advance to make headlines and attract attention.

Comments Bannon made about the James Comey firing were posted on the 60 Minutes Overtime website, which delivers outtakes from the show’s segments, and became so newsworthy Monday that they arguably should have been used in the original piece.

The show would often ignore big breaking-news stories in the past, figuring they were told elsewhere. Fager likes to find some element that hasn’t received much attention but can help a viewer better understand the event, citing Kroft’s reporting on the financial crisis a decade ago.

“The quality of the show has not dropped off,” Kroft said. “We’ve had good seasons and bad seasons all during the 30 years I’ve been here. I think the show is more timely than it used to be.”

Producers watch the ratings, but refuse to test audience preferences with polls.

“It’s really risky to do what we do,” Fager said. “It goes against everything the professionals in news organizations believe, that you have to pander, that you have to look for stories that they’re going to want, as opposed to doing stories that are important and figuring out how to do it well.”

60 Minutes has made high-profile mistakes; the reliance on a bad source in Logan’s 2014 Benghazi story was a major blemish. If the show has a weakness, it is that story length can simplify some stories too much, said Tom Bettag, a longtime television news producer who now teaches at the University of Maryland.

Yet the storytelling and writing put the show far ahead of the competition. Unlike such newsmagazines as Dateline NBC and ABC’s 20/20 that have chased after trends and lost their identity, “what 60 Minutes did was stay consistent to its brand, to its vision, year in and year out,” he said.

60 Minutes has a rich tradition of principals who hold on to their jobs well past retirement age. The 72-year-old Kroft, who has cut back on stories and recently signed a two-year contract, doesn’t want to be one of them. Stahl, 75, said she wants to continue as long as she can do the job. She went to Fager a few years ago and said she didn’t want to fade on television and would tell him if she could sense herself slipping.

“He looked at me and said, ‘No, you won’t. Nobody ever does that.’ And he very kindly offered to do it for me,” she said with a laugh.

Oprah Winfrey joins ’60 Minutes’ for 50th anniversary year

CBS’ “60 Minutes,” the newsmagazine that can credit consistency for much of its success as it enters its 50th anniversary year, is about to see a major change with the addition of Oprah Winfrey.

Winfrey will debut Sept. 24, reporting on a story about America’s political divisions.

It’s a testament to the power of the Sunday-night newsmagazine that it seeks to absorb one of television’s biggest stars into its fabric instead of the other way around. One of the medium’s best-known celebrity interviewers will do some, but will largely work against type in reporting stories, said Jeff Fager, the show’s executive producer.

“She wants to do stories with impact,” he said. “She’s driven by that and so are we. That’s part of why this is such a good fit for her.”

Many of the names that made “60 Minutes” great — Mike Wallace, Morley Safer, Ed Bradley, Don Hewitt — are gone now. But the stopwatch keeps ticking every Sunday at 7 p.m. While everything in media seems to have changed around it, the show’s mix of investigations, news-making interviews, esoteric and entertaining features timed to the length of founding executive producer Hewitt’s attention span remains remarkably unchanged.

“It’s a miracle,” correspondent Lesley Stahl said.

When she joined in 1991, Hewitt told Stahl that he wanted correspondents to be like actors in a repertory troupe who could play all the roles, and that’s still the philosophy she uses to plan stories she pursues.

Gone, too, are the volatile days of throwing coffee cups, shouting matches and feuds, of Wallace peeking at colleagues’ notebooks to steal stories. But it’s still keenly competitive. Newcomer Bill Whitaker told Fager he dreamed of screening a story that his bosses found so perfect it merited no changes. Fager leaned in and told him, “that’s not going to happen.”

There’s a different pressure from the daily deadlines of the evening news, Whitaker said. At “60 Minutes,” correspondents have time, talented producers and travel budgets. So they’d better deliver.

“Everyone is trying to find an original story, something that breaks news or helps people to understand a big story,” Fager said. “That’s what we do. New people up here realize that’s a higher bar than is set anywhere else.”

“People think it’s cutthroat,” he said. “It’s not like that, the way our image would suggest. But it’s a tough place to succeed. Part of how you’re judged is how original your reporting is, and how well you cover a big story.”

Scott Pelley, Stahl, Steve Kroft, Whitaker and Anderson Cooper make up the show’s core. Charlie Rose, Winfrey, Sharyn Alfonsi, Lara Logan, David Martin, Norah O’Donnell and Jon Wertheim are among the contributors who also do stories.

“There are a lot of people who are contributors who have other jobs, and that has changed the feel of the place,” Kroft said. “I don’t think the show has changed very much on the air.”

Fager, who just completed a book on the show to mark the anniversary, talks now about how hard it was to replace Hewitt 15 years ago. Colleagues say his status as an insider at CBS News and “60 Minutes” helped him, along with the absence of an ego-driven need to make changes for change’s sake.

His biggest push has been to make the show more on the news. Interviewing former presidential adviser Steve Bannon this past Sunday illustrates the point, and Fager pushed out excerpts of the interview for a few days in advance to make headlines and attract attention. Comments Bannon made about the James Comey firing were posted on the “60 Minutes Overtime” website, which delivers outtakes from the show’s segments, and became so newsworthy Monday that they arguably should have been used in the original piece.

The show would often ignore big breaking-news stories in the past, figuring they were told elsewhere. Fager likes to find some element that hasn’t received much attention but can help a viewer better understand the event, citing Kroft’s reporting on the financial crisis a decade ago.

“The quality of the show has not dropped off,” Kroft said. “We’ve had good seasons and bad seasons all during the 30 years I’ve been here. I think the show is more timely than it used to be.”

Producers watch the ratings, but refuse to test audience preferences with polls.

“It’s really risky to do what we do,” Fager said. “It goes against everything the professionals in news organizations believe, that you have to pander, that you have to look for stories that they’re going to want, as opposed to doing stories that are important and figuring out how to do it well.”

“60 Minutes” has made high-profile mistakes; the reliance on a bad source in Logan’s 2014 Benghazi story was a major blemish. If the show has a weakness, it is that story length can simplify some stories too much, said Tom Bettag, a longtime television news producer who now teaches at the University of Maryland.

Yet the storytelling and writing put the show far ahead of the competition. Unlike newsmagazines like “Dateline NBC” and ABC’s “20/20” that have chased after trends and lost their identity, “what ’60 Minutes’ did was stay consistent to its brand, to its vision, year in and year out,” he said.

“60 Minutes” has a rich tradition of principals who hold on to their jobs well past retirement age. The 72-year-old Kroft, who has cut back on stories and recently signed a two-year contract, doesn’t want to be one of them. Stahl, 75, said she wants to continue as long as she can do the job. She went to Fager a few years ago and said she didn’t want to fade on television and would tell him if she could sense herself slipping.

“He looked at me and said, ‘No, you won’t. Nobody ever does that.’ And he very kindly offered to do it for me,” she said with a laugh.

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First Look: “Two by Two” | Greenleaf | Oprah Winfrey Network



Charity’s plan to sing backup on a national tour hits a roadblock. Meanwhile, Deputy Mayor Leonard offers Jacob an enticing deal as the new head of Triumph. For more on #Greenleaf, visit

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About Greenleaf:
The original drama series Greenleaf from award-winning writer/producer Craig Wright takes viewers into the unscrupulous world of the Greenleaf family and their sprawling Memphis megachurch, where scandalous secrets and lies are as numerous as the faithful. Born of the church, the Greenleaf family love and care for each other, but beneath the surface lies a den of iniquity—greed, adultery, sibling rivalry and conflicting values—that threatens to tear apart the very core of their faith that holds them together.

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Oprah Winfrey Network is the first and only network named for, and inspired by, a single iconic leader. Oprah Winfrey’s heart and creative instincts inform the brand — and the magnetism of the channel.

Winfrey provides leadership in programming and attracts superstar talent to join her in primetime, building a global community of like-minded viewers and leading that community to connect on social media and beyond. OWN is a singular destination on cable. Depth with edge. Heart. Star power. Connection. And endless possibilities.

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First Look: “Two by Two” | Greenleaf | Oprah Winfrey Network